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FACEBOOK: WORLD NOT ENOUGH FOR INTERNET GIANT WHOSE CEO ZUCKERBERG SAYS JOURNEY ONLY 1 PER CENT DONE

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The company is now far more than just a social network and has blown Wall Street away with its latest results. But should we be concerned about its growing power?

“Our journey is only 1 per cent done,” said Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg after unveiling a set of numbers that had even Wall Street’s hardened analysts bowing down and crying “we’re not worthy”.

Apparently it’s a saying around the stunningly successful IT company, the tendrils of which continue to extend ever more deeply into our day-to-day lives. Translation “you ain’t seen nothin’ yet”. Did you just shudder? I did. Just a bit.

Mr Zuckerburg’s baby is now far more than just “the social network”, with apologies to the same-named biopic. It is a dominant force in mobile advertising (growth of 63 per cent). It is a huge platform for the delivery of media globally, including The Independent. Its messaging services are used from Shanghai, to Singapore to Sheffield. And it has a licence to print money.

The internet’s migration to mobile has secured that, helping Facebook to smash through the $6bn in revenue Wall Street had forecast for the April-to-June reporting period. The actual number came in at $6.4bn, up 59 per cent.

And it was only just over 12 years ago that a website called TheFacebook went live in New England. Chew on that.

Facebook won’t. That’s ancient history to a company that is running faster than Usain Bolt on steroids. Did you know that you can now take 360 degree photos with its apps? That its video services are growing like Japanese knotweed? These are expected to dominate its services before too long, and YouTube owner Google has reason to be nervous. Along with WhatsApp, bought for $19bn just under two years ago, it connects in excess of 2bn people through messaging.

Further out, Facebook has ambitions to to bring the internet to vast numbers of previously unconnected people through its solar powered Aquila drones. They will presumably then become Facebook users and continue to power its staggering growth.

Does that sound like pie in the sky? It shouldn’t. They’re flying. Mr Zuckerberg says tests have been successful. They’ll be out there before too long.

In the meantime the company mines data with scary efficiency. It knows us, it knows our views, what what we like, what we don’t like, what films we enjoy, perhaps the bands we listen to, the books we read, what we spend our money on. That last one is key.

And it’s only 1 per cent done.

It is true that many IT companies that once looked like world beaters have either disappeared or been gobbled up on the cheap. Remember MySpace? Not many do. Yahoo! just announced that it is preparing to join AOL in Verizon’s stable of second-raters. Twitter is starting to show signs that it might one day join them. It isn’t there yet but growth is stalling, revenues are sagging and younger rivals such as Instagram and SnapChat are nipping at its heels.

Facebook, however, crossed the rubicon a long time ago. It is now big and powerful enough to buy its way out of either trouble or rapid and unexpected change in consumer habits.

In many ways Facebook has enriched our lives. When I came within an ace of being killed in a cycling accident it was Facebook that my family used to disseminate the news among our friends and family. It was Facebook that was the conduit for the support we desperately needed. The positive impct of the company should not be under esimtated. It’s some story.

However, Facebook has also become enormously powerful. And this is what worries me. How would you feel if, I don’t know, Rupert Murdoch had his hands on that power? Or even Sir Philip Green, as opposed to  the nice, liberal, if socially awkward, Mr Zuckerberg?

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HUAWEI MATE 20 PRO TIPPED TO SPORT A 6.9-INCH SAMSUNG OLED DISPLAY

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arlier this month, Huawei introduced the Watch 2 smartwatch with an eSIM and voice call support. Now, a new development claims that the company is procuring OLED displays from Samsung. The South Korean giant is said to have already sent out samples to Huawei, and if all goes well, full scale production is expected to start by Q3 2018. The smartphone to sport these 6.9-inch OLED panels is said to release sometime in the fourth quarter or even early 2019, and we largely expect to see them on the Huawei Mate 20 Pro.

South Korean media The Bell reports that Samsung is in the process of finalising samples with Huawei for its order of 6.9-inch OLED displays. These large-sized displays are usually seen on Huawei’s P series or Mate series. While the P30 series is not expected to arrive before MWC 2019, the Mate series traditionally arrives sometime in Q4. Furthermore, with the screen size being so large, we expect the Pro version to sport the 6.9-inch display, while the Mate 20 could sport a 6.1-inch or some such.

If Huawei is indeed bringing a 6.9-inch display smartphone, it should easily win the screen size battle, as the iPhone X Plus is expected to sport a 6.5-inch display, while the Samsung Galaxy Note 9 is expected to sport a 6.4-incher. These large sized displays are very popular in the Chinese market, and Huawei wants to meet expectations in its home market. Bigger screens are popular also because of the large text area used by the Chinese language, the report adds. Huawei wouldn’t want to lose its momentum in its biggest market by not staying ahead of its game.

Of course, all of this is based on sheer speculation, and we expect you to take everything with a pinch of salt, till Huawei makes things official.

 

 

Source: Gadget360

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WWDC: WHEN APPLE WATCH BECAME A PLATFORM

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Many incremental improvements mean Apple Watch is becoming more effective for communication, augmentation and more.

Apple’s watchOS 5 plays to the strengths of Apple Watch and opens up some new and interesting ways to develop for and make use of the device.

The enterprise case for Apple Watch

Apple always says its goal with the Apple Watch is to deliver brief and meaningful interactions at exactly the right time.

This dedication to context and convenience means that when the company ships the next iteration of the OS, it will make its solution much more essential to anyone who needs to stay up to date while remaining focused on the matter at hand, or who needs to stay in touch while leaving the phone behind.

Communications boost

Apple Watch is becoming a viable alternative to an iPhone. watchOS 5 builds on the built-in SIM the company put inside the device last year with a series of enhancements:

  • The most immediately useful improvement for most of us will be the ability to connect to a Wi-Fi network straight from the Apple Watch.
  • Walkie-talkie lets you contact friends and family just by pushing a button on your device, once you set them up. This works over Wi-Fi and cellular connections, and it can connect people worldwide.
  • You can answer FaceTime and Group FaceTime calls as audio calls on your watch.

In combination with the device’s existing ability to dictate notes and messages, and the new addition of support for looking at websites (see below), Apple Watch has become a powerful communications tool in its own right.

Take notifications

There was a huge cheer at WWDC when Apple announced the introduction of Grouped Notifications on iPhone. This extends to Apple Watch, making it far easier to manage and control the alerts you receive.

The newly introduced Dynamic Notifications feature is something that both public-facing business offering front-end app support to customers and enterprise firms deploying their own proprietary iOS apps will want to explore.

This lets developers add additional steps to a notification — a restaurant may remind you of your booking and ask you to confirm (or change) your arrival time or the number of guests that should be expected. Or a ride sharing app may let you pay, rate, and tip for your ride — all from within the notification.

Finally, Critical Alerts are a new kind of notification intended for extremely urgent alerts. These need to be given explicit user permission to work and are intended to alert wearers to things such as heart rate anomalies or diabetes-related blood sugar warnings.

Siri gets lots better

The updated Siri watch face is a great illustration to show how much smarter Siri has become across all Apple platforms.

Siri will use the watch to provide the wearer with a host of additional predictive and proactive shortcuts throughout the day “… based on routines, locations and information such as heart rate after a workout, commute time with Maps at the appropriate time of day, or sports scores for a favorite team.”

What makes this even more interesting is that it will now show actionable content from third-party apps, which is great for consumer and specialized enterprise apps.

Siri Shortcuts also makes it to the new Apple Watch OS.

Apple is pushing developers to ensure the Apple Watch shortcuts they provide are to the most relevant tasks. The basis for deciding this might be time, location, or app utility (a recipe app may provide a recipe of the day, for example).

What Apple sees as critical is that these notifications are interacted with and truly represent what Apple Watch users need.

App developers need to note that when Siri decides which Shortcuts it will offer on the Siri Watchface, Siri will pay particular attention to how the user has interacted with your app in the past.

Also, you don’t need to say “Hey, Siri” to activate the assistant. All you need to do is start speaking to Siri as you raise the Watch towards you.

The intention is that you will be able to use Siri to get essential tasks done from your Watch, and you will be able to explore new ways to enhance customer and employee experiences when using your app.

The tiny web

Do you remember how Steve Jobs — when announcing the original iPhone — boasted that the iPhone offered people access to the real internet, rather than some stripped-down version?

watchOS 5 brings a little of that same delight and now integrates WebKit support, which means you can use your watch to glance at things such as web links or other items sent to you.

You can control the content, too:

  • Turn the Digitial Crown to scroll the page.
  • Double-tap to zoom in and out.
  • Use Force Touch (a firm press) to invoke back and forward buttons you can use to navigate through your viewing history.

It’s not perfect — you can’t access video playback or web fonts, though you can use your Watch to fill in HTML-based forms. Apple will render pages in Reader Mode when that mode is available.

All the same, some people will wonder if web designers will now need to figure out how to design websites that scale all the way from a Watch to a 30-inch display.

Health and wellness

There are lots of workout improvements in Apple Watch, including auto-workout detection. Not only does your Watch figure out when you are exercising, but it will also terminate a workout once it detects the activity is over. New yoga and hiking workouts and helpful tools for runners makes the device even more useful as part of your general scheme to stay well. And Activity Sharing competitions let you invite others to compete in meeting those activity challenges.

Additional improvements

Control Center lets you put all your toggles in the order you most prefer. You can also get to Notifications and/or Control Center while in any app.

Apple Watch users will gain a new Podcasts app. This will sync with shows, as well as stream any new shows Siri can find on your behalf. Enterprise users and developers will need to know that Apple will now allow audio from third-party apps to sync to the watch for offline playback.

 

 

 

 

Source: Computer World

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ISACA INSTALLS 2018-2019 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

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Schaumburg, IL, USA (11 June 2018)—ISACA, a global business technology association serving more than 450,000 professionals, installed its 2018-2019 Board of Directors at its Annual General Meeting in Chicago, Saturday 10 June. Rob Clyde was elected to lead ISACA’s board as chair.

“It is an incredible privilege and opportunity to lead this dynamic organization as we help enterprises navigate digital transformation and help individuals transform their careers,” said Clyde. “I am grateful to serve alongside a global professional community that is ensuring the technologies and advancements we embrace are safe, secure, reliable and resilient for both individuals and for enterprises.”

An industry leader within the security and technology space with more than 30 years of experience, Clyde is managing director of Clyde Consulting LLC, which provides board and executive advisory services to cybersecurity software and other companies. In addition to his role as ISACA’s newest chair, Clyde serves as executive chair for White Cloud Security, board director for Titus and executive advisor to HyTrust and BullGuard. He is also a Board Leadership Fellow of the U.S. National Association of Corporate Directors. Prior to his current board and executive advisory work, Clyde served as the chief executive officer of Adaptive Computing, was chief technology officer at Symantec and cofounder of Axent Technologies.

At ISACA, Clyde previously served as board vice chair and director, chaired the board-level ISACA Finance Committee, and served as a member of ISACA’s Strategic Advisory Council, Conference and Education Board and the IT Governance Institute (ITGI) Advisory Panel. He is a frequent speaker at ISACA and other global cyber security, technology and governance conferences. He also serves on the industry advisory council for the Management Information Systems (MIS) Department of Utah State University (USA).

“Rob has served ISACA and our global professional community for many years, and his technical expertise, paired with his business acumen and leadership skills, make him an ideal choice for ISACA board chair,” said ISACA CEO Matt Loeb. “The expanding digital business challenges and risks facing the enterprises and professionals we serve requires innovative thinking, including new expert resources, assessment tools and training solutions. Our 2018-2019 board members are remarkably experienced and dedicated individuals who will contribute to ISACA’s increasing visibility, influence and impact globally.”

Also named to a new leadership role on ISACA’s Board of Directors is Vice-chair Brennan Baybeck, vice president of Global IT Risk Management for Oracle Corp. Baybeck has more than 20 years of experience in IT security, risk, audit and consulting, and has worked in various industries designing, implementing and operating enterprise-wide programs to address global security risks. He has held leadership positions at Sun Microsystems, StorageTek and Qwest Communications.

In total, 13 leaders were installed on the 2018-2019 ISACA Board during the organization’s annual business meeting:

  • Chair Rob Clyde, CISM, managing director of Clyde Consulting LLC
  • Vice Chair Brennan P. Baybeck, CISA, CISM, CRISC, CISSP, vice president of Global IT Risk Management for Oracle Corp.
  • Director Tracey Dedrick, former chief risk officer, Hudson City Bancorp
  • Director Leonard Ong, CISA, CISM, CRISC, CGEIT, CPP, CFE, PMP, CIPM, CIPT, CISSP ISSMP-ISSAP, CSSLP, CITBCM, GCIA, GCIH, GSNA, GCFA, associate director at Merck & Co., Inc.
  • Director R.V. Raghu, CISA, CRISC, director of Versatilist Consulting India Pvt. Ltd.
  • Director Gabriela Reynaga, CISA, CRISC, founder and chief executive officer of Holistics GRC Consultancy
  • Director Gregory Touhill, Brigadier General (ret), USAF, CISM, CISSP, president of Cyxtera Federal Group, Cyxtera Technologies
  • Director Theodore H. Wolff, CISA, head of IT & Security Global Assurance practices in Vanguard’s Global IT & Security Risk and Control group
  • Director Tichaona Zororo, CISA, CISM, CGEIT, CRISC, COBIT 5 Certified Assessor, CIA, CRMA, IT advisory executive with EGIT | Enterprise Governance of IT (Pty) Ltd.
  • Director Matt Loeb, CGEIT, CAE, FASAE, ISACA chief executive officer

Past chairs who remain on the ISACA Board are:

  • Director and Chair (2017-2018) Theresa Grafenstine, CISA, CGEIT, CRISC, CPA, CISSP, CIA, CGMA, CGAP, managing director at Deloitte & Touche LLP
  • Director and Chair (2015-2017) Chris Dimitriadis, Ph.D., CISA, CISM, CRISC, ISO 20000 LA, group director of Information Security for INTRALOT
  • Director and Chair (2014-2015) Robert E Stroud, CGEIT, CRISC, chief product officer at XebiaLabs

The 2018-2019 Board will lead ISACA as it celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2019. Photos and biographies of all board members are available at www.isaca.org/board.

United States and China.

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