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GOOGLE’S NEW RECAPTCHA AUTOMATICALLY TELLS YOU ARE NOT A BOT

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Over the years, Google has utilised a number of methods to distinguish between human and bots on the web. Its take on the CAPTCHA (Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart) test, known as reCAPTCHA, has required you to transcribe distorted words, confirm Street View addresses or simply just tick a box. Soon, you won’t need to do the hard work, because Google’s making the system invisible.

Using a combination of machine learning and advanced risk analysis, Google has updated its system to detect user habits without dedicated interaction. When you arrive on a web page, the controls should disappear and serve the relevant content. However, if you do trip Google’s risk analysis algorithms, you may need to quickly solve one of the search giant’s puzzles.

While the new system is invisible, it will still consider variables like your IP address and the movements of your mouse. Google says its technology will “actively consider a user’s engagement with the CAPTCHA — before, during, and after — to determine whether that user is a human.” That means no more transcription, which offered a human balance to Google’s optical character recognition, but you may now find what you were looking for a lot quicker.

Source:https://www.engadget.com/2017/03/10/google-new-invisible-recaptcha/?sr_source=Twitter

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SCAMMERS ABUSE MULTILINGUAL DOMAIN NAMES

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Cyber-criminals are abusing multilingual character sets to trick people into visiting phishing websites.

The non-English characters allow scammers to create “lookalike” sites with domain names almost indistinguishable from legitimate ones.

Farsight Security found scam sites posing as banks, loan advisers and children’s brands Lego and Haribo.

Smartphone users are at greater risk as small screens make lookalikes even harder to spot.

Targeted attack
The Farsight Security report looked at more than 100 million domain names that use non-English character sets – introduced to make the net more familiar and usable for non-English speaking nations – and found about 27% of them had been created by scammers.

It also uncovered more than 8,000 separate characters that could be abused to confuse people.

Farsight founder Paul Vixie, who wrote much of the software underpinning the net’s domain names told the BBC: “Any lower case letter can be represented by as many as 40 different variations.”

And many internationalised versions added just a tiny fleck or mark that was not easy to see.

Eldar Tuvey, founder and head of security company Wandera, said it had also seen an upsurge in phishing domains using different ways of forming characters.

In particular, it had seen an almost doubling of the number of scam domains created using an encoding system called punycode over the past few months.

And phishing gangs were using messages sent via mobile apps to tempt people into clicking on the similar-looking links.

“They are targeting specific groups,” Mr Tuvey said.

And research had established people were three times more likely to fall for a phishing scam presented on their phone.

“To phish someone, you just have to fool them once,” Mr Tuvey said. “Tricking them into installing malware is much more work.”

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STATE OF CYBERSECURITY 2018

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LEARN ABOUT SEVERAL CLEAR CHALLENGES ENTERPRISES ARE FACING

For the fourth year in a row, ISACA has surveyed security leaders worldwide to determine their insights and experiences with key cybersecurity issues, ranging from workforce challenges and opportunities to the emerging threat landscape.

Part 1 of the report is now available and provides key insights into the current trends in the threat landscape. Among the findings:

  • Overall results confirm that cybersecurity remains dynamic and turbulent as the field continues to mature
  • Skill challenges remain but are better understood
  • Gender disparity is present but can be mitigated
  • It is predicted that budgets will increase at a higher rate than last year-64% of respondents indicate that their security budgets will expand
  • Confidence in preparedness is increasing but organizational alignment is inconsistent

Download your FREE copy of the White Paper – State of Cybersecurity 2018, Part 1 to see how your experience compares to the findings.

 

Source: CSX

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GLOBAL RELEASE: SMART CITIES POSE NEW SECURITY CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

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chaumburg, IL, USA (29 May 2018) — As smart cities integrate connected technologies to operate more efficiently and improve the quality of city services, new vulnerabilities arise that require diligent governance of municipal technology. New ISACA research on smart cities reveals several key areas of consideration when it comes to the security of these cities and the critical infrastructure systems they depend upon.

Global survey respondents flag the energy sector to be the critical infrastructure system most susceptible to cyberattacks (71%), followed by communications (70%) and financial services (64%). Interestingly enough, energy and communications also are among the top three critical infrastructure sectors that respondents anticipate can benefit the most from smart cities, along with transportation.

The research shows that malware/ransomware and denial of service are the two most concerning types of smart infrastructure attacks. Additionally, respondents noted that cities’ smart infrastructure is most likely to be targeted by nation-states (67%) and hacktivists (63%).

Despite the many threats for which cities are specifically vulnerable, only 15% of respondents consider cities to be most equipped to contend with smart infrastructure cyber attacks, compared to 55% who think the national government would be better suited to deal with the threats.

“Before our cities can be identified as being ‘smart,’ we must first and foremost transfer this smart attitude to the way we approach and govern the rollout of new technology and systems,” said Robert E Stroud, CGEIT, CRISC, past ISACA board chair and chief product officer at XebiaLabs. “Our urban centers have many potentially attractive targets for those with ill intent, so it is critical that cities make the needed investments in well-trained security professionals and in modernizing their information and technology infrastructure.”

The majority of respondents consider implementing new tools and techniques such as smart grids and artificial intelligence for cybersecurity to be important, but less than half of respondents consider those likely to be implemented in the next five years.

The need for more effective communication with residents living in a developing smart city also is apparent, as 3 in 4 respondents indicate that municipal governments have not educated residents well about the benefits of living in smart cities. Tapping into smart technology to modernize parking, ID systems and other city services can create efficiencies and lessen congestion.

ISACA’s research polled around 2,000 global respondents in February and March 2018. More information on the research and related resources can be found at www.isaca.org/smart-cities-survey.

 

 

 

 

Source: ISACA

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