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Chameleon Comic

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I’m a longtime fan of Comedy Central’s The Daily Show. When Jon Stewart stepped down as host in 2015, I was sad to see him go. I was also worried for his replacement, Trevor Noah, a South African comedian. Stewart’s style is so unusual that I didn’t see how anyone could fill his shoes—especially someone like Noah, who describes himself as an outsider. As popular as Noah was in South Africa, I didn’t know whether his humor would connect with American audiences.

I’m happy to report that I was wrong. Millions of viewers—myself included—are tuning into The Daily Show because Noah’s show is every bit as good as Stewart’s. His humor has a lightness and optimism that’s refreshing to watch. What’s most impressive is how he uses his outside perspective to his advantage. He’s good at making fun of himself, America, and the rest of the world. His comedy is so universal that it has the power to transcend borders.

Reading Noah’s memoir, Born a Crime, I quickly learned how Noah’s outsider approach has been honed over a lifetime of never quite fitting in. Born to a black South African mother and a white Swiss father in apartheid South Africa, he entered the world as a biracial child in a country where mixed race relationships were forbidden. Noah was not just a misfit, he was (as the title says) “born a crime.”

In South Africa, where race categories are so arbitrary and yet so prominent, Noah never had a group to call his own. As a little boy living under apartheid laws, he couldn’t be seen in public with his white father or his black mother. In public, his father would walk far ahead of him to ensure he wouldn’t be seen with his biracial son. His mother would pose as a maid to make it look like she was just babysitting another family’s child. On the schoolyard, he didn’t fit in with the white kids or the black kids or the kids who were “colored” (the term used in South Africa to describe people of mixed race).

But during his childhood, he quickly discovered that there’s a freedom that comes with being a misfit. A polyglot who speaks English, Afrikaans, Xhosa, Zulu, Tsonga, Tswana, as well as German and Spanish, Noah used his talent for language to bounce from group to group and win acceptance from all of them. One of my favorite stories in the book involves Noah walking down the street when he overhears a group of men speaking in Zulu about how they were plotting to mug “this white guy.” Noah realizes they were referring to him. Noah spins around and announces in perfect Zulu that they should all mug someone together. The Zulu men are startled that Noah speaks Zulu and a tense situation is defused. Noah is immediately accepted as one of their own.

Again and again throughout his childhood, he discovered that language was more powerful than skin color in building connections with other people. “I became a chameleon,” Noah writes. “My color didn’t change, but I could change your perception of my color. If you spoke to me in Zulu, I replied to you in Zulu. If you spoke to me in Tswana, I replied to you in Tswana. Maybe I didn’t look like you, but if I spoke like you, I was you.”

Much of Noah’s story of growing up in South Africa is tragic. His Swiss father moves away. His family is desperately poor. He’s arrested. And in the most shocking moment, his mother is shot by his stepfather. Yet in Noah’s hands, these moving stories are told in a way that will often leave you laughing. His skill for comedy is clearly inherited from his mother. Even after she’s shot in the face, and miraculously survives, she tells her son from her hospital bed to look at the bright side. “’Now you’re officially the best-looking person in the family,’” she jokes.

“If my mother had one goal, it was to free my mind.”— Trevor Noah

In fact, Noah’s mother emerges as the real hero of the book. She’s an extraordinary person who is fiercely independent and raised her son to be the same way. Her greatest gift was to give her son the ability to think for himself and see the world from his own perspective. If my mother had one goal, it was to free my mind,” he writes. Like many fans of Noah’s, I am thankful she did.

source:https://www.gatesnotes.com/Books/Born-a-Crime?WT.mc_id=20170701153100_SummerBooks2017_BornACrime_BG-TW&WT.tsrc=BGTW&linkId=39242747

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ISACA INSTALLS 2018-2019 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

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Schaumburg, IL, USA (11 June 2018)—ISACA, a global business technology association serving more than 450,000 professionals, installed its 2018-2019 Board of Directors at its Annual General Meeting in Chicago, Saturday 10 June. Rob Clyde was elected to lead ISACA’s board as chair.

“It is an incredible privilege and opportunity to lead this dynamic organization as we help enterprises navigate digital transformation and help individuals transform their careers,” said Clyde. “I am grateful to serve alongside a global professional community that is ensuring the technologies and advancements we embrace are safe, secure, reliable and resilient for both individuals and for enterprises.”

An industry leader within the security and technology space with more than 30 years of experience, Clyde is managing director of Clyde Consulting LLC, which provides board and executive advisory services to cybersecurity software and other companies. In addition to his role as ISACA’s newest chair, Clyde serves as executive chair for White Cloud Security, board director for Titus and executive advisor to HyTrust and BullGuard. He is also a Board Leadership Fellow of the U.S. National Association of Corporate Directors. Prior to his current board and executive advisory work, Clyde served as the chief executive officer of Adaptive Computing, was chief technology officer at Symantec and cofounder of Axent Technologies.

At ISACA, Clyde previously served as board vice chair and director, chaired the board-level ISACA Finance Committee, and served as a member of ISACA’s Strategic Advisory Council, Conference and Education Board and the IT Governance Institute (ITGI) Advisory Panel. He is a frequent speaker at ISACA and other global cyber security, technology and governance conferences. He also serves on the industry advisory council for the Management Information Systems (MIS) Department of Utah State University (USA).

“Rob has served ISACA and our global professional community for many years, and his technical expertise, paired with his business acumen and leadership skills, make him an ideal choice for ISACA board chair,” said ISACA CEO Matt Loeb. “The expanding digital business challenges and risks facing the enterprises and professionals we serve requires innovative thinking, including new expert resources, assessment tools and training solutions. Our 2018-2019 board members are remarkably experienced and dedicated individuals who will contribute to ISACA’s increasing visibility, influence and impact globally.”

Also named to a new leadership role on ISACA’s Board of Directors is Vice-chair Brennan Baybeck, vice president of Global IT Risk Management for Oracle Corp. Baybeck has more than 20 years of experience in IT security, risk, audit and consulting, and has worked in various industries designing, implementing and operating enterprise-wide programs to address global security risks. He has held leadership positions at Sun Microsystems, StorageTek and Qwest Communications.

In total, 13 leaders were installed on the 2018-2019 ISACA Board during the organization’s annual business meeting:

  • Chair Rob Clyde, CISM, managing director of Clyde Consulting LLC
  • Vice Chair Brennan P. Baybeck, CISA, CISM, CRISC, CISSP, vice president of Global IT Risk Management for Oracle Corp.
  • Director Tracey Dedrick, former chief risk officer, Hudson City Bancorp
  • Director Leonard Ong, CISA, CISM, CRISC, CGEIT, CPP, CFE, PMP, CIPM, CIPT, CISSP ISSMP-ISSAP, CSSLP, CITBCM, GCIA, GCIH, GSNA, GCFA, associate director at Merck & Co., Inc.
  • Director R.V. Raghu, CISA, CRISC, director of Versatilist Consulting India Pvt. Ltd.
  • Director Gabriela Reynaga, CISA, CRISC, founder and chief executive officer of Holistics GRC Consultancy
  • Director Gregory Touhill, Brigadier General (ret), USAF, CISM, CISSP, president of Cyxtera Federal Group, Cyxtera Technologies
  • Director Theodore H. Wolff, CISA, head of IT & Security Global Assurance practices in Vanguard’s Global IT & Security Risk and Control group
  • Director Tichaona Zororo, CISA, CISM, CGEIT, CRISC, COBIT 5 Certified Assessor, CIA, CRMA, IT advisory executive with EGIT | Enterprise Governance of IT (Pty) Ltd.
  • Director Matt Loeb, CGEIT, CAE, FASAE, ISACA chief executive officer

Past chairs who remain on the ISACA Board are:

  • Director and Chair (2017-2018) Theresa Grafenstine, CISA, CGEIT, CRISC, CPA, CISSP, CIA, CGMA, CGAP, managing director at Deloitte & Touche LLP
  • Director and Chair (2015-2017) Chris Dimitriadis, Ph.D., CISA, CISM, CRISC, ISO 20000 LA, group director of Information Security for INTRALOT
  • Director and Chair (2014-2015) Robert E Stroud, CGEIT, CRISC, chief product officer at XebiaLabs

The 2018-2019 Board will lead ISACA as it celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2019. Photos and biographies of all board members are available at www.isaca.org/board.

United States and China.

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THE US ECONOMY IS SUFFERING FROM LOW DEMAND

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We have concluded that demand matters for productivity growth and that increasing demand is key to restarting growth across advanced economies, write James Manyika, Jaana Remes, and Jan Mischke in Harvard Business Review.

A little over a century ago, Henry Ford doubled the minimum pay of his workers to $5 a day. When other employers followed suit, it became clear that Ford had sparked a chain reaction. Higher pay throughout the industry helped lead to more sales, creating a virtuous cycle of growth and prosperity. Could we be at another Henry Ford moment?

Some major companies have announced plans to boost employee pay. Target raised its minimum wage to $11 this past fall and committed to $15 by 2020. More recently, Walmart announced plans to match that increase to $11. In banking, Wells Fargo and Fifth Third Bancorp also announced pay increases for minimum wage employees.

These pay increases have occurred against a backdrop of weak economic growth and rising income inequality. Economic growth has been stuck in low gear for almost a decade now, averaging around 2% a year since 2010 while productivity growth, the key to increasing living standards, has been languishing near historic lows since the financial crisis. But more recently there has been a glimmer of hope. After stagnating for years, wages have begun picking up slightly, as has productivity growth, while corporate profits remain near record highs.

Are these recent wage increases merely necessary in light of a tightening labor market, or could they start a broader trend that may change our economic growth trajectory?

After a year-long analysis of seven developed countries and six sectors, we have concluded that demand matters for productivity growth and that increasing demand is key to restarting growth across advanced economies.

The impact of demand on productivity growth is often underappreciated. Looking closer at the period following the financial crisis, 2010 to 2014, we find that weak demand played a key role in the recent productivity growth decline to historic lows. In fact, about half of the slowdown in productivity growth — from an average of 2.4% in the United States and Western Europe in 2000 to 2004 to 0.5% a decade later — was due to weak demand and uncertainty.

For example, in the mid-1990s to the mid-2000s, rising consumer purchasing power boosted productivity growth in both the retail and the auto sector, by encouraging a shift to higher-value goods that can be supplied at higher productivity levels. In the auto sector, as customers in the early 2000s purchased higher value-added SUVs and premium vehicles in both the United States and Germany, they spurred incremental productivity growth of 0.4 to 0.5 percentage points. Today, that trend has slowed slightly in both countries, contributing only 0.3 percentage points to productivity growth in the period 2010 to 2014.

Similarly, in retail, we estimate that consumers shifting to higher-value goods, for example higher-value wines or premium yogurts, contributed 45% to the 1995-2000 retail productivity acceleration in the United States. This subsequently waned, dragging down productivity growth.

To put it simply, when consumers have more to spend, they buy more sophisticated things. That’s good not just for consumers and producers, but for the overall economy, because making more sophisticated, higher-value things makes everyone involve more productive, and therefore helps increase overall standards of living.

In addition, we found two other ways weak demand hurt productivity growth in the aftermath of the financial crisis: a reduction in economies of scale and weak investment.

First, the economies of scale effect. In finance, productivity growth declined particularly in the United States, United Kingdom, and Spain due to contractions in lending volumes that banks were unable to fully offset with staff cuts due to the need for fixed labor (for example to support branch networks and IT infrastructure or to deal with existing loans and bad debt). The utilities sector, which has seen flattening demand growth due to both energy efficiency policies as well as a decline in economic activity during the crisis, was similarly not able to downsize labor due to the need for labor to support electricity distribution and the grid infrastructure, and here, too, productivity growth fell.

Second, the effect of weak investment. We have found from our global surveys of businesses that almost half of companies that are increasing their investment budgets are doing so because of an increase in demand. Demand is the single most important factor driving corporate investment decisions. Investment, in turn, is critical for productivity growth, as it equips workers with more – and with more recent and innovative – equipment, software, and structures. But we have seen capital intensity growth fall to the lowest levels in post-WWII history. Weaker demand leads to weaker investment and creates a vicious cycle for productivity and income growth.

Of course, the financial crisis is long since over, and the economy has recovered, at least by some measures. So what’s to worry about? Won’t demand return to pre-recession levels, and thereby increase productivity?

Unfortunately, there is reason to believe that some of the drags on demand for goods and services may be more structural than crises-related. Slowing population growth means less rapid expansion of the pool of consumers. And rising income inequality is shifting purchasing power from those most likely to spend to those more likely to save. This is reflected in slowing growth expectations in many markets. For example, across our sectors and countries studied, in the decade from 1995 to 2004, growth in demand for goods and services averaged 4.6%, slowed to 2.3% in 2010 to 2014, and is forecast to slightly increase to 2.8% in 2014 to 2020.

Today, there is concern about where the next wave of growth will come from. Some prominent economists worry that we may be stuck in a vicious cycle of economic underperformance for some time. Our analyses strongly suggest that supporting sustained demand growth needs to be part of the answer. Demand may deserve attention to help boost productivity growth not only during the recovery from the financial crisis but also in terms of longer-term structural leakages and their impact on productivity. Suitable tools for this longer-term situation include: focusing on productive investment as a fiscal priority, growing the purchasing power of low-income consumers with the highest propensity to consume, unlocking private business and residential investment, and supporting worker training and transition programs to ensure that periods of transition do not disrupt incomes.

Companies play a key role in promoting growth through investment and innovation as well as supporting their workforce through training programs. Yet companies may also want to consider the words of Ford when he said: “The owner, the employees, and the buying public are all one and the same, and unless an industry can so manage itself as to keep wages high and prices low it destroys itself, for otherwise it limits the number of its customers. One’s own employees ought to be one’s own best customers.” While this is certainly not true for individual companies, it is true for the broader economy, and we might be at a rare point where the representatives of employees and employers alike share a common interest in healthy wage growth.

 

 

 

 

Source:  Harvard Business Review.

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CEO's

GLASSDOOR JUST NAMED THE TOP 100 CEOS (AND THE RESULTS MIGHT SURPRISE YOU)

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Glassdoor just announced the results of its 2017 Employees’ Choice Awards for the highest-rated CEOs leading companies with 1,000 or more employees in North America and parts of Europe. The results are based on the anonymous feedback of employees who complete a company review of their CEO’s leadership.

While some of the CEOs are household names (everyone’s heard of Elon Musk, No. 8, and Mark Zuckerberg, No. 10), many of the CEOs are relatively unknown to the general public. Regardless, each has earned a spot on the Glassdoor list.

Here, then, are the top-100 CEOs for 2017. Is yours on the list?

1. The Clorox Company
Benno Dorer​

CEO Approval Rating: 99%

2. World Wide Technology
Jim Kavanaugh

CEO Approval Rating: 99%

3. Boston Scientific
Michael F. Mahoney

CEO Approval Rating: 99%

4. Memorial Sloan Kettering
Craig B. Thompson

CEO Approval Rating: 99%

5. Fast Enterprises
Martin Rankin

CEO Approval Rating: 99%

6. Nvidia
Jen-Hsun Huang

CEO Approval Rating: 99%

7. Bain & Company
Bob Bechek

CEO Approval Rating: 98%

8. SpaceX
Elon Musk

CEO Approval Rating: 98%

9. HubSpot
Brian Halligan

CEO Approval Rating: 98%

10. Facebook
Mark Zuckerberg

CEO Approval Rating: 98%

11. Paylocity
Steve Beauchamp

CEO Approval Rating: 98%

12. McKinsey & Company
Dominic Barton

CEO Approval Rating: 97%

13. Intuit
Brad Smith

CEO Approval Rating: 97%

14. Power Home Remodeling
Corey Schiller & Asher Raphael

CEO Approval Rating: 97%

15. Salesforce
Marc Benioff

CEO Approval Rating: 97%

16. H E B
Charles C. Butt

CEO Approval Rating: 97%

17. Google
Sundar Pichai

CEO Approval Rating: 96%

18. United Airlines
Oscar Munoz

CEO Approval Rating: 96%

19. Adobe
Shantanu Narayen

CEO Approval Rating: 96%

20. T-Mobile
John Legere

CEO Approval Rating: 96%

21. Enterprise Holdings
Pamela M. (Pam) Nicholson

CEO Approval Rating: 96%

22. NBCUniversal
Stephen B. Burke

CEO Approval Rating: 96%

23. CDW
Thomas E. Richards

CEO Approval Rating: 96%

24. SAP
Bill McDermott

CEO Approval Rating: 96%

25. Morrison Healthcare
Tim Pierce

CEO Approval Rating: 96%

26. Bloomberg L.P.
Michael R. Bloomberg

CEO Approval Rating: 95%

27. Nestlé Purina
Joseph R. Sivewright

CEO Approval Rating: 95%

28. QuikTrip
Chet Cadieux III

CEO Approval Rating: 95%

29. Microsoft
Satya Nadella

CEO Approval Rating: 95%

30. Johnson & Johnson
Alex Gorsky

CEO Approval Rating: 95%

31. Juniper Networks
Rami Rahim

CEO Approval Rating: 95%

32. Yardi Systems
Anant Yardi

CEO Approval Rating: 94%

33. Capital One
Richard D. Fairbank

CEO Approval Rating: 94%

34. Cheesecake Factory
David Overton

CEO Approval Rating: 94%

35. LinkedIn
Jeff Weiner

CEO Approval Rating: 94%

36. In-N-Out Burger
Lynsi Snyder

CEO Approval Rating: 94%

37. Chick-fil-A
Dan T. Cathy

CEO Approval Rating: 94%

38. Square
Jack Dorse
y
CEO Approval Rating: 94%

39. Expedia
Dara Khosrowshahi

CEO Approval Rating: 94%

40. Deloitte
Cathy Engelbert

CEO Approval Rating: 94%

41. Republic Services
Donald W. (Don) Slager

CEO Approval Rating: 94%

42. Slalom Consulting
Brad Jackson

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

43. Accenture
Pierre Nanterme

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

44. Ryan LLC
G. Brint Ryan

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

45. Sephora
Calvin McDonald

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

46. Paychex
Martin Mucci

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

47. Travelers
Alan D. Schnitzer

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

48. Zillow
Spencer Rascoff

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

49. Hilton
Christopher Nassetta

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

50. Monsanto Company
Hugh Grant

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

51. Texas Instruments
Rich Templeton

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

52. Nike
Mark G. Parker

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

53. Apple
Tim Cook

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

54. Kronos Incorporated
Aron J. Ain

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

55. Delta Air Lines
Ed Bastian

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

56. CBRE
Robert E. Sulentic

CEO Approval Rating: 92%

57. Stryker
Kevin A. Lobo

CEO Approval Rating: 92%

58. Ikea
Peter Agnefjall

CEO Approval Rating: 92%

59. Fannie Mae
Tim Mayopoulos

CEO Approval Rating: 92%

60. John Deere
Samuel Allen

CEO Approval Rating: 92%

61. Topgolf
Ken May

CEO Approval Rating: 92%

62. AbbVie
Richard A. Gonzalez

CEO Approval Rating: 92%

63. TD
Bharat Masrani

CEO Approval Rating: 92%

64. Bayada Home Health Care
J. Mark Baiada

CEO Approval Rating: 92%

65. General Motors
Mary Barra

CEO Approval Rating: 91%

66. Booz Allen Hamilton
Horacio D. Rozanski

CEO Approval Rating: 91%

67. Northwell Health
Michael J. Dowling

CEO Approval Rating: 91%

68. Kaiser Permanente
Bernard J. Tyson

CEO Approval Rating: 91%

69. Discover
David W. Nelms

CEO Approval Rating: 91%

70. EY
Mark Weinberger

CEO Approval Rating: 91%

71. BASF Corporation
Wayne T. Smith

CEO Approval Rating: 91%

72. Sport Clips
Gordon B. Logan

CEO Approval Rating: 91%

73. Fidelity Investments
Abby Johnson

CEO Approval Rating: 91%

74. Goldman Sachs
Lloyd C. Blankfein

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

75. Prudential
John R. Strangfeld

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

76. Procter & Gamble
David S. Taylor

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

77. Best Buy
Hubert Joly

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

78. Raytheon
Thomas A. Kennedy

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

79. Cardinal Health
George S. Barrett

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

80. Greystar
Bob Faith

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

81. Northern Trust
Rick Waddell

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

82. BlackRock
Laurence D. Fink

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

83. VMware
Pat Gelsinger

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

84. JetBlue
Robin Hayes

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

85. J.P. Morgan
Jamie Dimon

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

86. REI
Jerry Stritzke

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

87. eBay
Devin Wenig

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

88. Costco Wholesale
Craig Jelinek

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

89. Northrop Grumman
Wesley G. Bush

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

90. Northwestern Mutual
John E. Schlifske

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

91. Rockwell Collins
Kelly Ortberg

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

92. Cox Communications
Pat Esser

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

93. Progressive Insurance
Tricia Griffith

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

94. Gartner
Gene Hall

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

95. SAIC
Anthony Moraco

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

96. Southwest Airlines
Gary C. Kelly

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

97. UniFirst
Ronald D. Croatti

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

98. Nordstrom
Blake W. Nordstrom

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

99. Lockheed Martin
Marillyn Hewson

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

100. Stitch Fix
Katrina Lake
CEO Approval Rating: 89%

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