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Turn Up the color with the Samsung Galaxy Tab s

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During the event

Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd announced the Galaxy Tab S, Samsung’s thinnest and lightest tablet to date. This Super AMOLED tablet combines the most advanced display technology with a full range of premium content for an unrivaled entertainment experience. The Galaxy Tab S is also powered with enhanced productivity features for effortless multitasking, all elegantly housed in a highly stylish, yet practical design.

“The tablet is becoming a popular personal viewing device for enjoying content, which makes the quality of the display a critical feature,” said JK Shin, CEO and President of IT & Mobile Division, Samsung Electronics. “With the launch of the Galaxy Tab S, Samsung is setting the industry bar higher for the entire mobile industry. It will provide consumers with a visual and entertainment experience that brings colors to life, beautifully packaged in a sleek and ultra-portable mobile device.”

Turn up the Color with the Industry’s Best Mobile Display – Super AMOLED

The Galaxy Tab S embodies the next evolution in mobile display technology, delivering a wider range of rich and crisp colors. Its industry-leading WQXGA (2560×1600, 16:10) Super AMOLED display delivers more than 90% of Adobe RGB color coverage – expressing more colors than ever before – and has a remarkable 100,000:1 contrast ratio which provides deeper and more realistic images by making blacks darker and whites brighter.

The Galaxy Tab S also features additional Samsung screen technologies that go beyond the hardware specifications. The tablet’s Adaptive Display ensures the best visual experience anywhere, anytime by intelligently adjusting gamma, saturation, and sharpness based on the application being viewed, the color temperature of the viewing environment and ambient lighting. Pre-set professional modes – AMOLED Cinema and AMOLED Photo – also let users manually adjust the display settings for bright, dynamic results for both video and photo content.

In addition, Galaxy Tab S users can fully enjoy content clearly and easily outdoors, even in bright sunlight. The tablet’s advanced outdoor visibility technology makes on-screen content look bright, natural, and easy to view.

Since Super AMOLED technology doesn’t require a backlight, the Galaxy Tab S consumes less energy than comparative LCD displays while maintaining a very portable design. Both models have a sleek 6.6mm profile and at only 465g (10.5-inch) and 294g (8.4-inch), that are light and easy to carry. With its longer-lasting battery, and Ultra-Power Saving Mode, the Galaxy Tab S lets consumer enjoy hours of entertainment without having to worry about recharging.

Premium Content Eco-System

The Galaxy Tab S is made for entertainment and comes packed with a variety of content including:

– Samsung’s magazine service, “Papergarden” debuts on the Galaxy Tab S. An optimized viewing environment for digital interactive magazines, users will be able to view a wide range of popular magazines with vivid and true-to-life colors.

– Galaxy Gifts: Samsung has teamed up with more than 30 of the world’s leading mobile content and service providers to offer its Galaxy Tab S users the ultimate home, work, and play entertainment experience through premium content and services across a wide range of industries. Some of these include:

With Samsung’s strategic partnership with Marvel, Galaxy Tab S users will be able to access over 15,000 Marvel Comics through 3 months of unlimited free membership to Marvel’s “Marvel Unlimited” app.

Kindle for Samsung: Exclusively for Samsung customers, and customized for the Galaxy Tab S, users will receive a free book every month through Samsung Book Deals, plus the ultimate e-reading experience with access to a vast selection of e-books in the Kindle store.

– Samsung has also partnered with Google Play, Google’s online digital entertainment store offering apps, games, music, movies, books and magazines. To get Galaxy Tab S users started, Samsung and Google Play are offering several gifts: access to a range of movie and entertainment content, including the Warner Bros. Academy Award winning movie “Gravity” as well a variety of books and magazines from top publishers through the “My Library” widget.

Furthermore, Galaxy Tab S users can now enjoy Netflix, available in high definition for the first time for Galaxy users in select countries.

Stylish Form Factor and Practical Accessories

Beautifully crafted and designed with architectural aesthetics, the Galaxy Tab S is modern and sleek.

Extending this design identity, the Galaxy Tab S offers a choice of several fashionable and practically designed custom accessories. The Book Cover accessory configures to three different display angles to provide the most comfortable position to watch videos, read or type. For users looking for the same protective structure of the Book Cover but with a slimmer design, Samsung offers the Simple Cover that offers a perfectly fitting, lightweight protection. The Bluetooth Keyboard is a new, ergonomically designed ultra-slim keyboard designed specifically for the Galaxy Tab S which perfectly pairs the device with the keyboard with a clasp for better protection. 

The Galaxy Experience – Productivity Features That Help You Multitask

The Galaxy Tab S delivers an unmatched selection of enhanced productivity and security features that provide users with the ability to effortlessly and safely multitask. Users can make and receive calls directly from their phone to their Galaxy Tab S, anywhere at home, no matter where their phone is with the Call Forwarding feature via SideSync 3.0. The Galaxy Tab S also allows consumers to truly multitask, enabling them to surf the web, watch videos, share content and make calls simultaneously without having to worry about closing out of one to access another. With Quick Connect, Galaxy Tab S quickly finds and connects to nearby devices, for easy content sharing. These features are all available on both WiFi and LTE versions.

Additional useful features include a ‘Multi User Mode’ that enables users to create their own personal optimized profile, safe and convenient access with a built-in ‘Fingerprint Scanner,’ and a specially designed ‘Kids’ Mode’ with its own dedicated interface and kid-friendly applications.

The Samsung Galaxy Tab S will come in a variety of connectivity options: Wi-Fi, or Wi-Fi and LTE, available in 16/32GB* + MicroSD (up to 128GB). Users can also choose between the 10.5-inch and 8.4-inch versions, in Titanium Bronze or Dazzling White. The Galaxy Tab S will be available in selective markets from July, 2014.

source:http://www.albawaba.com/business/pr/samsung-galaxy-tab-s-584135

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GOOGLE BOWS TO WORKER PRESSURE ON SEXUAL MISCONDUCT POLICY

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Google is promising to be more forceful and open about its handling of sexual misconduct cases, a week after thousands of high-paid engineers and others walked out in protest over its male-dominated culture.

Google bowed to one of the protesters’ main demands by dropping mandatory arbitration of all sexual misconduct cases. That will now be optional, so workers can choose to sue in court and present their case in front of a jury.

It mirrors a change made by ride-hailing service Uber after complaints from its female employees prompted an internal investigation. The probe concluded that its rank had been poisoned by rampant sexual harassment.

“Google’s leaders and I have heard your feedback and have been moved by the stories you’ve shared,” CEO Sundar Pichai said in an email to Google employees.

“We recognize that we have not always gotten everything right in the past and we are sincerely sorry for that. It’s clear we need to make some changes.” Thursday’s email was obtained by The Associated Press.

Last week, the tech giant’s workers left their cubicles in dozens of offices around the world to protest what they consider management’s lax treatment of top executives and other male workers accused of sexual harassment and other misconduct. The protest’s organizers estimated that about 20,000 workers participated.

The reforms are the latest fallout from a broader societal backlash against men’s exploitation of their female subordinates in business, entertainment and politics — a movement that has spawned the “MeToo” hashtag as a sign of unity and a call for change.

Google will provide more details about sexual misconduct cases in internal reports available to all employees. The breakdowns will include the number of cases that were substantiated within various company departments and list the types of punishment imposed, including firings, pay cuts and mandated counselling.

The company is also stepping up its training aimed at preventing misconduct. It’s requiring all employees to go through the process annually instead of every other year. Those who fall behind in their training, including top executives, will be dinged in annual performance reviews, leaving a blemish that could lower their pay and make it more difficult to get promoted.

But Google didn’t address protesters’ demand for a commitment to pay women the same as men doing similar work.

When previously confronted with accusations that it shortchanges women — made by the U.S. Labour Department and in lawsuits filed by female employees — Google has maintained that its compensation system doesn’t discriminate between men and women.

The changes didn’t go far enough to satisfy Vicki Tardif Holland, a Google employee who helped organize and spoke at the protests near the company’s Cambridge, Massachusetts, office last week.

“While Sundar’s message was encouraging, important points around discrimination, inequity and representation were not addressed,” Holland wrote in an email responding to an AP inquiry.

Nevertheless, employment experts predicted the generally positive outcome of Google’s mass uprising is bound to have ripple effects across Silicon Valley and perhaps the rest of corporate America.

“These things can be contagious,” said Thomas Kochan, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology management professor specializing in employment issues.

“I would expect to see other professionals taking action when they see something wrong.”

Some employers might even pre-emptively adopt some of Google’s new policies, given its prestige, said Stephanie Creary, who specializes in workplace and diversity issues at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School.

“When Google does something, other employers tend to copy it,” she said.

Google got caught in the crosshairs two weeks ago after The New York Times detailed allegations of sexual misconduct against the creator of Google’s Androidsoftware, Andy Rubin.

The newspaper said Rubin received a USD90 million severance package in 2014 after Google concluded the accusations were credible. Rubin has denied the allegations.

Like its Silicon Valley peers, Google has already acknowledged that its workforce is too heavily concentrated with white and Asian men, especially in the highest-paying executive and computer-programming jobs. Women account for 31 per cent of Google’s employees worldwide, and it’s lower for leadership roles.

Critics believe that gender imbalance has created a “brogammer” culture akin to a college fraternity house that treats women as sex objects. As part of its ongoing efforts, Google will now require at least one woman or a non-Asian ethnic minority to be included on the list of candidates for executive jobs.

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GOOGLE OUTLINES STEPS TO TACKLE WORKPLACE HARASSMENT

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Google on Thursday outlined changes to its handling of sexual misconduct complaints, hoping to calm outrage that triggered a worldwide walkout of workers last week.

“We recognise that we have not always gotten everything right in the past and we are sincerely sorry for that,” chief executive Sundar Pichai said in a message to employees. “It’s clear we need to make some changes.”

Arbitration of harassment claims will be optional instead of obligatory, according to Pichai, a move that could end anonymous settlements that fail to identify those accused of harassment.

“Google has never required confidentiality in the arbitration process and it still may be the best path for a number of reasons (e.g. personal privacy, predictability of process), but, we recognise that the choice should be up to you,” he said in the memo.

image: https://content.thestar.com.my/smg/settag/name=lotame/tags=all

A section of an internal “Investigations Report” will focus on sexual harassment to show numbers of substantiated concerns as well as trends and disciplinary actions, according to the California-based company.

He also said Google is consolidating the complaint system and that the process for handling concerns will include providing support people and counselors. Google will update its mandatory sexual harassment training, and require it annually instead of every two years as had been the case.

Less booze

Google is also putting the onus on team leaders to tighten the tap on booze at company events, on or off campus, to curtail the potential for drunken misbehavior.

“Harassment is never acceptable and alcohol is never an excuse,” Google said in a released action statement. “But, one of the most common factors among the harassment complaints made today at Google is that the perpetrator had been drinking.”

Google policy already bans excessive consumption of alcohol on the job; while on company business, or at  work-related events.Some teams at the company have already instituted two-drink limits at events or use ticket systems, Google said.

Google executives overseeing events will be expected to strongly discourage excessive drinking, according to the company, which vowed “onerous actions” if problems persisted. The company also promised to “recommit” to improving workplace diversity through hiring, retention, and career advancement.’ –

Googleplex walkout

Thousands of Google employees joined a coordinated worldwide walkout a week ago to protest the US tech giant’s handling of sexual harassment. A massive turnout at the “Googleplex” in Silicon Valley was the final stage of a global walkout that began in Asia and spread to Google offices in Europe.

Some 20,000 Google employees and contractors participated in the protest in 50 cities around the world, according to organisers. Demma Rodriguez, head of equity engineering and a seven-year Google employee, said during the walkout that it was an important part of bringing fairness to the technology colossus.

“We have an aspiration to be the best company in the world,” Rodriguez said. “But we also have goals as a company and we can’t decide we are going to miss those.” The protest took shape after Google said it had fired 48 employees in the past two years – including 13 senior executives – as a result of allegations of sexual misconduct.

Demands posted by organisers included an end to forced arbitration in cases of harassment and discrimination for all current and future employees, along with a right for every Google worker to bring a co-worker, representative, or supporter when filing a harassment claim.In a statement organisers commended Google for the response, but said more changes are needed.

“We demand a truly equitable culture, and Google leadership can achieve this by putting employee representation on the board and giving full rights and protections to contract workers,” organiser Stephanie Parker said in the statement.

Along with sexual harassment, Google needs to address racism and discrimination that includes inequity in pay and promotions, organisers said. “They all have the same root cause, which is a concentration of power and a lack of accountability at the top,” Parker said. – AP

Source:  https://www.thestar.com.my/tech/tech-news/2018/11/09/google-outlines-steps-to-tackle-workplace-harassment/#HJzOgT86K4srKCt1.99

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POOR WEBSITE DESIGNS COULD TRIGGER LEGAL ACTIONS

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Internet marketing has become so popular that e-commerce retail sales in the United States are on pace to double between 2009 and 2018, with sales amounting to US$127.3 billion in just the second quarter of 2018, according to an August 2018 update from the U.S. Census Bureau.

The transaction value of e-commerce service industry contracts reached $600 billion in 2016. Despite the rush to digital commerce, the rules for business transactions are still the same, whether they are concluded on paper or electronically.

Essentially, that means legally valid sales agreements need to demonstrate clearly that both vendors and consumers are aware of — and consent to — the terms of the agreements. It is especially important for vendors to ward off expensive class action suits by including contract terms that prohibit such suits and instead rely on arbitration to resolve any issues with consumers.

Yet recent federal court cases indicate that poorly presented Internet contracts can result in the nullification of arbitration provisions and class action prohibitions — thus giving consumers greater leverage in legal disputes with vendors. Usually the breakdown occurs when vendors mismanage either the display or the content of their websites — and sometimes both.

Website Messages Must be Conspicuous

The most recent example is a June case in which the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit issued a decision. The case stemmed from complaints that Uber Technologies wrongly added the cost of local tolls in and around Boston to customers’ bills. In Cullinane v. Uber, a federal district court initially ruled in favor of Uber and dismissed the complaint.

However, such is the state of differing perspectives on applicable laws, that the appellate court overturned the district court and ruled against the company.

Uber failed to convince the appeals court that the website sales agreement properly displayed both an arbitration clause and a prohibition against litigation, because the notice was not “conspicuous” enough to be legally valid. Absent adequate notice to the customer, there could be no agreement between the parties over terms and conditions, the court said in denying Uber’s motion to compel arbitration.

The case provided insight into the importance to vendors of arbitration clauses as a way to fend off class action suits.

Compared to litigation, arbitration is a “speedy, fair, inexpensive, and less adversarial” process, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce said in an amicus brief in the Uber case. Members of the organization “have structured millions of contractual relationships — including enormous numbers of on-line contracts — around arbitration agreements.”

Similar suits dealing with the issue include a second case against Uber with a different plaintiff and over a different issue, as well as separate cases involving Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

In each case, courts have gotten into the weeds of website design, finding flaws in styles, the choice of colors, the size of printing fonts, and the use of hyperlinks.

For example, in Cullinane v. Uber, the appellate court noted that the website connection to the contract terms “did not have the common appearance of a hyperlink” because it was framed in a gray box in white bold text, rather than the normal blue underline style. Other screens on the site utilized similar highlight features causing the court to conclude that if “everything on the screen is written with conspicuous features, then nothing is conspicuous.”

Uber’s petition for a rehearing of the case was denied by the appeals court in a July 23, 2018, ruling. The company had no comment on the litigation, Uber spokesperson Alix Anfang told the E-Commerce Times.

Pulling the Trigger on Consent

Of equal importance with presentation is the vendor’s choice of using active or passive mechanisms to obtain customer consent to the terms and conditions of agreements.

In Nicosia v. Amazon, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit overturned a district court decision favoring the company, and instead ruled in favor of the consumer plaintiffs.

The Second Circuit described two major types of customer consent mechanisms. The first, called a “clickwrap” procedure, involves the use of an “I accept” button, which forces customers to “expressly and unambiguously manifest assent,” according to the court.

A more passive alternative is a “browserwrap,” which “involves terms and conditions posted via a hyperlink” and does not request an express showing of consent. “In a seeming effort to streamline customer purchases, Amazon chose not to employ a clickwrap mechanism,” the court noted in the August 2016 ruling.

Ultimately, the court based its decision not on the consent mechanism per se, but on Amazon’s failure to display its terms adequately. The result was that “reasonable minds could disagree” on the adequacy of the company’s notice to consumers.

Amazon declined to comment for this story, spokesperson Cecilia Fan told the E-Commerce Times.

The significant variance among federal courts on the validity of Internet contracts may be caused more by different judicial perceptions than by differing laws covering “conspicuous” or “reasonably communicated and accepted” terms.

While these cases have been brought in federal courts, there is no federal standard for what constitutes adequate notice. Thus, for procedural reasons associated with the Federal Arbitration Act, federal judges have relied on applicable contracting law in different states, including California, Massachusetts, Washington and New York.

“I do not yet see a majority of courts moving toward a single legal standard, especially not one that is adapted to today’s technology,” said Liz Kramer, a partner at Stinson, Leonard, Street.

The U.S. Appeals Court for the Second Circuit reached opposite results in recent cases “despite pretty similar circumstances,” she told the E-Commerce Times. One problem “is that state law applies, and the states are not consistent on what makes terms conspicuous enough to form part of the contract.”

“Different courts define the standard in different ways, but they all boil down to the principle that the arbitration clause — and the links to the clause — must be clearly presented to the consumer in order for there to be a meeting of the minds — in other words, an acceptance — of the arbitration clause,” said Mark Levin, a partner at Ballard Spahr.

“It is not so much the standard that is unsettled, but the application of the standard to the facts, since each website is unique and there are a multitude of factors, both in content and visual display, to consider in determining whether the consumer accepted the clause,” he told the E-Commerce Times.

“Even if there was a U. S. Supreme Court decision, or legislation that defined a single standard, there would still be a need to apply that standard to unique facts in virtually every case,” Levin said.

Web Designers Should Seek Legal Help

While vendors strive to create ever more attractive and compelling websites, designers and marketing staffs need to address the basic nuts and bolts of contract communications, said Levin.

For electronic documents, vendors should “refer to the arbitration clause near the beginning of the terms and conditions, make sure the link to the clause is obvious and clear, minimize the number of mouse clicks it takes for the reader to get to the clause, and refer to the arbitration clause again at the end, close to an electronic signature or ‘I agree’ button,” he advised.

The easiest way for e-commerce vendors to avoid trouble is to skip any indirect notification procedure, suggested Stinson’s Kramer. Deliberate downplaying of key contract terms is an invitation to legal challenge.

“The best way to ensure that an arbitration agreement is enforceable with customers who agree online, or through an app, is to have them actually click ‘I agree’ after reviewing the terms and conditions,” she said.

“Great care should be taken in designing and structuring a website arbitration clause, since courts scrutinize every detail, cautioned Levin.

“This is definitely an area where businesses should enlist legal counsel to help with the design, substance and placement of the clause to help ensure that a court will enforce it,” he said. “If adequate attention is not paid to these issues at the outset, the business could end up in a debilitating class action lawsuit.”

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