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BMW i8 review: This is what the future of cars will look like

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Sat in front of us, in all its futuristic glory, the BMW i8 got us thinking: “What is it that really excites us about technology?”After a day in Scotland spent driving about in an i8, we feel like we have the answer. You see, for a consumer gadget to be desirable, the functionality is only half of what matters.

BMW i8

The i8 in ‘Protonic Blue’

Modern day gadgetry needs to wow us with its design as well as innovation. It needs to be a complete package that delivers a user experience beneficial to our daily lives, as well as exciting us every time we take it out of our pocket.

Pull the door handle on the i8 and watch as its clever dihedral doors swing out and up. You slip into the driver’s seat, surrounded by LCD screens, recycled materials and beautifully crafted dashboard panels. This is what technology is all about.

Those doors, not only do they look cool, but they save weight, which brings better economy and performance to the i8. Then there is the big 8-inch LCD sat in the centre of the dash – it’ll get you home, play your favourite song and show you just how efficiently you are driving.

The i8 is a hugely ambitious piece of technology.

Looking like a concept car that you can own, it’s designed to be a flagship product for BMW’s new electric ‘i’ division.

The car itself uses a turbocharged 3-cylinder petrol engine mated to a powerful electric motor. It’s not unlike the ones you see in an F1 car, although the BMW’s is a lot smaller. It can run either in a fully electric mode, or as a hybrid that will catapult you from 0-60 mph in 4.4 seconds.

The performance it delivers is quite frankly astonishing. Given the i8 can return upwards of 100 mpg if you drive it right, BMW has worked some sort of witchcraft making the i8 as fast as it is. It’s congestion charge and road tax exempt too, so you can potter about silently through central London, in fully electric mode, not spending a single penny.

BMW i8

You can’t see the exhaust on the back of the i8

There is a catch though: it does cost £94,850, which is obviously a huge amount of money. The car also can only manage 23 miles on full electric mode, which means the seriously eco-minded will need to run the petrol engine at times just to complete journeys.

One other disappointment is the amount of work BMW has put into tweaking iDrive for the i8. Like the smaller and much cheaper i3, you get an altered version of BMW’s nav and entertainment system that is geared up to electric cars.

It certainly does the trick, but we would’ve liked to see more animation and design work put into the look and feel of iDrive. This is after all a hugely special car, so it’s disappointing to see very few menus devoted to all the extra fun that can be had with the i8.

Read: Audi TT tech hands-on

The same goes for the car’s digital speedo. Unlike what Audi has created with the ‘shape shifting’ dash found in the new TT, the i8’s setup looks cool but does little more than tell you how fast you’re going.

BMW i8

The design of the i8 is a thing to behold

Sending the car into sport mode will make it glow red, which we definitely liked, but years of being spoiled by smartphones and tablets left us wanting more from the dash.

The included HUD, however, is a totally different story. Detailed directions and the ability to completely control iDrive via an image projected onto your window screen is amazing.

BMW i8

The interior of the i8 is a very special place

These are fairly minor niggles for what is an incredible piece of technology. You really have to view the i8 as something more than a car. It’s proof that, in the future, getting from A to B will be fun as well as good for the environment.

We also think that owning an electric car is a statement in itself, so the car’s appearance should do just the same. Rather than just adding the words ‘hybrid’ to an already existing vehicle, BMW has created a complete product and system around owning an electric car.

Verdict

At the moment, Tesla is the only company doing anything even close to this and it’s seeing vast success doing so. Given that, traditionally, automotive technology has flagged a few years behind phones and PCs, we feel like BMW is turning the tables.

Apple and Samsung should be taking note. Technology is all about risks and pushing innovation, something which we really haven’t seen for a good while now from the major consumer electronics manufacturers.

BMW has played its hand, creating a hugely compelling, beautiful and altogether exciting piece of tech with the i8. Now it’s time for the competition to play catch-up.

source:http://www.digitalspy.co.uk/tech/feature/a584081/bmw-i8-review-this-is-what-the-future-of-cars-will-look-like.html#~oK4G6ES0kbnZYM

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GOOGLE BOWS TO WORKER PRESSURE ON SEXUAL MISCONDUCT POLICY

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Google is promising to be more forceful and open about its handling of sexual misconduct cases, a week after thousands of high-paid engineers and others walked out in protest over its male-dominated culture.

Google bowed to one of the protesters’ main demands by dropping mandatory arbitration of all sexual misconduct cases. That will now be optional, so workers can choose to sue in court and present their case in front of a jury.

It mirrors a change made by ride-hailing service Uber after complaints from its female employees prompted an internal investigation. The probe concluded that its rank had been poisoned by rampant sexual harassment.

“Google’s leaders and I have heard your feedback and have been moved by the stories you’ve shared,” CEO Sundar Pichai said in an email to Google employees.

“We recognize that we have not always gotten everything right in the past and we are sincerely sorry for that. It’s clear we need to make some changes.” Thursday’s email was obtained by The Associated Press.

Last week, the tech giant’s workers left their cubicles in dozens of offices around the world to protest what they consider management’s lax treatment of top executives and other male workers accused of sexual harassment and other misconduct. The protest’s organizers estimated that about 20,000 workers participated.

The reforms are the latest fallout from a broader societal backlash against men’s exploitation of their female subordinates in business, entertainment and politics — a movement that has spawned the “MeToo” hashtag as a sign of unity and a call for change.

Google will provide more details about sexual misconduct cases in internal reports available to all employees. The breakdowns will include the number of cases that were substantiated within various company departments and list the types of punishment imposed, including firings, pay cuts and mandated counselling.

The company is also stepping up its training aimed at preventing misconduct. It’s requiring all employees to go through the process annually instead of every other year. Those who fall behind in their training, including top executives, will be dinged in annual performance reviews, leaving a blemish that could lower their pay and make it more difficult to get promoted.

But Google didn’t address protesters’ demand for a commitment to pay women the same as men doing similar work.

When previously confronted with accusations that it shortchanges women — made by the U.S. Labour Department and in lawsuits filed by female employees — Google has maintained that its compensation system doesn’t discriminate between men and women.

The changes didn’t go far enough to satisfy Vicki Tardif Holland, a Google employee who helped organize and spoke at the protests near the company’s Cambridge, Massachusetts, office last week.

“While Sundar’s message was encouraging, important points around discrimination, inequity and representation were not addressed,” Holland wrote in an email responding to an AP inquiry.

Nevertheless, employment experts predicted the generally positive outcome of Google’s mass uprising is bound to have ripple effects across Silicon Valley and perhaps the rest of corporate America.

“These things can be contagious,” said Thomas Kochan, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology management professor specializing in employment issues.

“I would expect to see other professionals taking action when they see something wrong.”

Some employers might even pre-emptively adopt some of Google’s new policies, given its prestige, said Stephanie Creary, who specializes in workplace and diversity issues at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School.

“When Google does something, other employers tend to copy it,” she said.

Google got caught in the crosshairs two weeks ago after The New York Times detailed allegations of sexual misconduct against the creator of Google’s Androidsoftware, Andy Rubin.

The newspaper said Rubin received a USD90 million severance package in 2014 after Google concluded the accusations were credible. Rubin has denied the allegations.

Like its Silicon Valley peers, Google has already acknowledged that its workforce is too heavily concentrated with white and Asian men, especially in the highest-paying executive and computer-programming jobs. Women account for 31 per cent of Google’s employees worldwide, and it’s lower for leadership roles.

Critics believe that gender imbalance has created a “brogammer” culture akin to a college fraternity house that treats women as sex objects. As part of its ongoing efforts, Google will now require at least one woman or a non-Asian ethnic minority to be included on the list of candidates for executive jobs.

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GOOGLE OUTLINES STEPS TO TACKLE WORKPLACE HARASSMENT

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Google on Thursday outlined changes to its handling of sexual misconduct complaints, hoping to calm outrage that triggered a worldwide walkout of workers last week.

“We recognise that we have not always gotten everything right in the past and we are sincerely sorry for that,” chief executive Sundar Pichai said in a message to employees. “It’s clear we need to make some changes.”

Arbitration of harassment claims will be optional instead of obligatory, according to Pichai, a move that could end anonymous settlements that fail to identify those accused of harassment.

“Google has never required confidentiality in the arbitration process and it still may be the best path for a number of reasons (e.g. personal privacy, predictability of process), but, we recognise that the choice should be up to you,” he said in the memo.

image: https://content.thestar.com.my/smg/settag/name=lotame/tags=all

A section of an internal “Investigations Report” will focus on sexual harassment to show numbers of substantiated concerns as well as trends and disciplinary actions, according to the California-based company.

He also said Google is consolidating the complaint system and that the process for handling concerns will include providing support people and counselors. Google will update its mandatory sexual harassment training, and require it annually instead of every two years as had been the case.

Less booze

Google is also putting the onus on team leaders to tighten the tap on booze at company events, on or off campus, to curtail the potential for drunken misbehavior.

“Harassment is never acceptable and alcohol is never an excuse,” Google said in a released action statement. “But, one of the most common factors among the harassment complaints made today at Google is that the perpetrator had been drinking.”

Google policy already bans excessive consumption of alcohol on the job; while on company business, or at  work-related events.Some teams at the company have already instituted two-drink limits at events or use ticket systems, Google said.

Google executives overseeing events will be expected to strongly discourage excessive drinking, according to the company, which vowed “onerous actions” if problems persisted. The company also promised to “recommit” to improving workplace diversity through hiring, retention, and career advancement.’ –

Googleplex walkout

Thousands of Google employees joined a coordinated worldwide walkout a week ago to protest the US tech giant’s handling of sexual harassment. A massive turnout at the “Googleplex” in Silicon Valley was the final stage of a global walkout that began in Asia and spread to Google offices in Europe.

Some 20,000 Google employees and contractors participated in the protest in 50 cities around the world, according to organisers. Demma Rodriguez, head of equity engineering and a seven-year Google employee, said during the walkout that it was an important part of bringing fairness to the technology colossus.

“We have an aspiration to be the best company in the world,” Rodriguez said. “But we also have goals as a company and we can’t decide we are going to miss those.” The protest took shape after Google said it had fired 48 employees in the past two years – including 13 senior executives – as a result of allegations of sexual misconduct.

Demands posted by organisers included an end to forced arbitration in cases of harassment and discrimination for all current and future employees, along with a right for every Google worker to bring a co-worker, representative, or supporter when filing a harassment claim.In a statement organisers commended Google for the response, but said more changes are needed.

“We demand a truly equitable culture, and Google leadership can achieve this by putting employee representation on the board and giving full rights and protections to contract workers,” organiser Stephanie Parker said in the statement.

Along with sexual harassment, Google needs to address racism and discrimination that includes inequity in pay and promotions, organisers said. “They all have the same root cause, which is a concentration of power and a lack of accountability at the top,” Parker said. – AP

Source:  https://www.thestar.com.my/tech/tech-news/2018/11/09/google-outlines-steps-to-tackle-workplace-harassment/#HJzOgT86K4srKCt1.99

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POOR WEBSITE DESIGNS COULD TRIGGER LEGAL ACTIONS

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Internet marketing has become so popular that e-commerce retail sales in the United States are on pace to double between 2009 and 2018, with sales amounting to US$127.3 billion in just the second quarter of 2018, according to an August 2018 update from the U.S. Census Bureau.

The transaction value of e-commerce service industry contracts reached $600 billion in 2016. Despite the rush to digital commerce, the rules for business transactions are still the same, whether they are concluded on paper or electronically.

Essentially, that means legally valid sales agreements need to demonstrate clearly that both vendors and consumers are aware of — and consent to — the terms of the agreements. It is especially important for vendors to ward off expensive class action suits by including contract terms that prohibit such suits and instead rely on arbitration to resolve any issues with consumers.

Yet recent federal court cases indicate that poorly presented Internet contracts can result in the nullification of arbitration provisions and class action prohibitions — thus giving consumers greater leverage in legal disputes with vendors. Usually the breakdown occurs when vendors mismanage either the display or the content of their websites — and sometimes both.

Website Messages Must be Conspicuous

The most recent example is a June case in which the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit issued a decision. The case stemmed from complaints that Uber Technologies wrongly added the cost of local tolls in and around Boston to customers’ bills. In Cullinane v. Uber, a federal district court initially ruled in favor of Uber and dismissed the complaint.

However, such is the state of differing perspectives on applicable laws, that the appellate court overturned the district court and ruled against the company.

Uber failed to convince the appeals court that the website sales agreement properly displayed both an arbitration clause and a prohibition against litigation, because the notice was not “conspicuous” enough to be legally valid. Absent adequate notice to the customer, there could be no agreement between the parties over terms and conditions, the court said in denying Uber’s motion to compel arbitration.

The case provided insight into the importance to vendors of arbitration clauses as a way to fend off class action suits.

Compared to litigation, arbitration is a “speedy, fair, inexpensive, and less adversarial” process, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce said in an amicus brief in the Uber case. Members of the organization “have structured millions of contractual relationships — including enormous numbers of on-line contracts — around arbitration agreements.”

Similar suits dealing with the issue include a second case against Uber with a different plaintiff and over a different issue, as well as separate cases involving Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

In each case, courts have gotten into the weeds of website design, finding flaws in styles, the choice of colors, the size of printing fonts, and the use of hyperlinks.

For example, in Cullinane v. Uber, the appellate court noted that the website connection to the contract terms “did not have the common appearance of a hyperlink” because it was framed in a gray box in white bold text, rather than the normal blue underline style. Other screens on the site utilized similar highlight features causing the court to conclude that if “everything on the screen is written with conspicuous features, then nothing is conspicuous.”

Uber’s petition for a rehearing of the case was denied by the appeals court in a July 23, 2018, ruling. The company had no comment on the litigation, Uber spokesperson Alix Anfang told the E-Commerce Times.

Pulling the Trigger on Consent

Of equal importance with presentation is the vendor’s choice of using active or passive mechanisms to obtain customer consent to the terms and conditions of agreements.

In Nicosia v. Amazon, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit overturned a district court decision favoring the company, and instead ruled in favor of the consumer plaintiffs.

The Second Circuit described two major types of customer consent mechanisms. The first, called a “clickwrap” procedure, involves the use of an “I accept” button, which forces customers to “expressly and unambiguously manifest assent,” according to the court.

A more passive alternative is a “browserwrap,” which “involves terms and conditions posted via a hyperlink” and does not request an express showing of consent. “In a seeming effort to streamline customer purchases, Amazon chose not to employ a clickwrap mechanism,” the court noted in the August 2016 ruling.

Ultimately, the court based its decision not on the consent mechanism per se, but on Amazon’s failure to display its terms adequately. The result was that “reasonable minds could disagree” on the adequacy of the company’s notice to consumers.

Amazon declined to comment for this story, spokesperson Cecilia Fan told the E-Commerce Times.

The significant variance among federal courts on the validity of Internet contracts may be caused more by different judicial perceptions than by differing laws covering “conspicuous” or “reasonably communicated and accepted” terms.

While these cases have been brought in federal courts, there is no federal standard for what constitutes adequate notice. Thus, for procedural reasons associated with the Federal Arbitration Act, federal judges have relied on applicable contracting law in different states, including California, Massachusetts, Washington and New York.

“I do not yet see a majority of courts moving toward a single legal standard, especially not one that is adapted to today’s technology,” said Liz Kramer, a partner at Stinson, Leonard, Street.

The U.S. Appeals Court for the Second Circuit reached opposite results in recent cases “despite pretty similar circumstances,” she told the E-Commerce Times. One problem “is that state law applies, and the states are not consistent on what makes terms conspicuous enough to form part of the contract.”

“Different courts define the standard in different ways, but they all boil down to the principle that the arbitration clause — and the links to the clause — must be clearly presented to the consumer in order for there to be a meeting of the minds — in other words, an acceptance — of the arbitration clause,” said Mark Levin, a partner at Ballard Spahr.

“It is not so much the standard that is unsettled, but the application of the standard to the facts, since each website is unique and there are a multitude of factors, both in content and visual display, to consider in determining whether the consumer accepted the clause,” he told the E-Commerce Times.

“Even if there was a U. S. Supreme Court decision, or legislation that defined a single standard, there would still be a need to apply that standard to unique facts in virtually every case,” Levin said.

Web Designers Should Seek Legal Help

While vendors strive to create ever more attractive and compelling websites, designers and marketing staffs need to address the basic nuts and bolts of contract communications, said Levin.

For electronic documents, vendors should “refer to the arbitration clause near the beginning of the terms and conditions, make sure the link to the clause is obvious and clear, minimize the number of mouse clicks it takes for the reader to get to the clause, and refer to the arbitration clause again at the end, close to an electronic signature or ‘I agree’ button,” he advised.

The easiest way for e-commerce vendors to avoid trouble is to skip any indirect notification procedure, suggested Stinson’s Kramer. Deliberate downplaying of key contract terms is an invitation to legal challenge.

“The best way to ensure that an arbitration agreement is enforceable with customers who agree online, or through an app, is to have them actually click ‘I agree’ after reviewing the terms and conditions,” she said.

“Great care should be taken in designing and structuring a website arbitration clause, since courts scrutinize every detail, cautioned Levin.

“This is definitely an area where businesses should enlist legal counsel to help with the design, substance and placement of the clause to help ensure that a court will enforce it,” he said. “If adequate attention is not paid to these issues at the outset, the business could end up in a debilitating class action lawsuit.”

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