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GOOGLE’S NEW RECAPTCHA AUTOMATICALLY TELLS YOU ARE NOT A BOT

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Over the years, Google has utilised a number of methods to distinguish between human and bots on the web. Its take on the CAPTCHA (Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart) test, known as reCAPTCHA, has required you to transcribe distorted words, confirm Street View addresses or simply just tick a box. Soon, you won’t need to do the hard work, because Google’s making the system invisible.

Using a combination of machine learning and advanced risk analysis, Google has updated its system to detect user habits without dedicated interaction. When you arrive on a web page, the controls should disappear and serve the relevant content. However, if you do trip Google’s risk analysis algorithms, you may need to quickly solve one of the search giant’s puzzles.

While the new system is invisible, it will still consider variables like your IP address and the movements of your mouse. Google says its technology will “actively consider a user’s engagement with the CAPTCHA — before, during, and after — to determine whether that user is a human.” That means no more transcription, which offered a human balance to Google’s optical character recognition, but you may now find what you were looking for a lot quicker.

Source:https://www.engadget.com/2017/03/10/google-new-invisible-recaptcha/?sr_source=Twitter

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The Ultimate Beginners Guide to GDPR Compliance in 2019

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What is GDPR?

By now you’ve probably all heard the term GDPR. Up until 25th May 2018 the guidelines surrounding personal information, in relation to privacy, were a bit wishy-washy. The Data Protection Directive (1995) did provide some basic guidelines but it simply wasn’t good enough.

We’ve always taken a keen interest in GDPR as many VPN’s have had to make serious changes to the way they operate inc some of the major players like Avast and NordVPN.

The monitoring and sharing of information is now covered under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This aims to ensure that information is handled responsibly, by any company that deals with personal information and privacy.

According to ICO, there are 7 key principles that GDPR sets out. These are:

  • Lawfulness, fairness and transparency
  • Purpose limitation
  • Data minimisation
  • Accuracy
  • Storage limitation
  • Integrity and confidentiality (security)
  • Accountability

The principles outlined aren’t rules as such, but more so an outline of fundamentals that should be followed when creating good data protection practice. If individuals or companies fail to comply with the principles, they could be fined up to €20 million, or 4% of your total worldwide annual turnover (whichever is higher).

What was before GDPR?

GDPR is applied throughout Europe, with each country having it’s own amount of control regarding certain aspects of the regulation. The U.K. has implemented the Data Protection Act (2018) which replaces the 1998 Data Protection Act.

The new act was passed through the House of Commons and House of Lords shortly before GDPR came into force.

Impact on businesses

Whether you’re an individual, organisation or company, you may be branded as a ‘controller’ or ‘processor’ of personal data. The Information Commissioners Officer (ICO) outlines exactly what the difference is between controllers and processors.

Businesses who monitor or obtain personal information on a large scale should employ a Data Protection Officer (DPO). The officer’s role should ensure that the company in question complies with GDPR. Any questions or queries regarding data protection should be directed to them.

GDPR applies to businesses that process personal data of EU citizens. This is the case even with businesses who employ less than 250 employees. As previously mentioned, any breach which could impact the rights of data subjects should be reported to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO).

If possible, a breach should be logged and reported within a 24 hour period, or 72 hours at the most. Details of the breach and how it is going to be contained and resolved must be outlined to the ICO.

GDPR will give individuals control on how businesses use their data. This also applies to businesses that already have your data. For example, individuals will have the ‘right to be forgotten’. So, if you’re a customer and no longer want a business to hold your personal data, you have a legal right to retract your data.

Helpful checklist for small businesses

GDPR is undoubtedly confusing, and understandably quite stressful! I thought it would be pertinent to put together a checklist for UK small businesses so you know what to expect, and what’s expected of you.

Your small business GDPR checklist should consider past and present employees, suppliers, and customers. It should also consider anyone’s data that you’re processing, collecting, storing, or recording, and using by any means.

1| Understand your data

You will need to understand and demonstrate your understanding of the types of personal data you and/or your business holds. For example, names, addresses, IP addresses, bank details, etc. This also includes sensitive data like religious views and health details. You’ll need to demonstrate that you understand where they come from and how you will be using such data.

2| Think about consent

Does your business require consent to process personal data? Some marketing techniques require consent which makes things much more difficult under GDPR. Consent must be extremely clear and specific, so unless you 100% know what you’re doing tt may be worth avoiding the need to rely on consent unless it’s crucial to your business model.

3| Consider security measures

Your security measures and policies that are in place must be updated to be GDPR compliant. What’s more, if you don’t have any in place already, you should get them pretty quickly! Although there are more specific demands regarding security, as a broad precaution, you could use encryption.

4| Subject access rights

Individuals have the right to access their personal data. You’ll need to ensure that your business is ready to provide this information within a short timeframe if necessary. Individuals may wish to obtain their personal data in order to rectify any issues, simply to have it, or they may wish to erase it altogether. All requests carry a timeframe of one month.

5| Train employees

Employees within your business should be trained in personal data. They will need to understand what constitutes personal data, as well as processes to identify any data breaches. Employees should be aware of who your Data Protection Officer (DPO) is, and any team or individuals related or responsive for data protection compliance.

6| Supply chain

All suppliers and contractors within your business need to be GDPR compliant. This is to ensure that they are not going to cause any breaches and pass any penalties or fines onto you. You will need to make sure that your contracts with your suppliers are updated too, so make sure you obtain a copy of this.

7| Fair processing

As part of GDPR, you must now be able to explain to individuals what you’re using their personal data for. This shouldn’t be a difficult task or one to worry about if you’re using their data fairly and correctly.

8| Data Protection Officer

It’s time to decide whether you need to employ a DPO or not. Small businesses are likely to be exempt, but larger businesses may not. It’s worth checking out to make sure you’re not in breach of any GDPR rules.

Defining consent

As an individual, you may be familiar with pre-ticked boxes when signing up for online accounts, purchasing products, registering for newsletters etc. These boxes were often pre-ticked and somewhat hidden, giving companies access to your personal data. Now, gone are the days of being bombarded by unwanted marketing emails and random phone calls.

Consent has been redefined under the new GDPR rules. Gone are the days of small print and hidden messages where individuals ‘accidentally’ or involuntarily sign up to marketing emails, texts, etc. Policies must be made abundantly clear now and be presented in such a manner.

Rules around pre-existing personal data are a little different. You may not require consent for this, but there must be a legal basis that’s compliant with the Data Protection Act (DPA). The main thing here is to remember that these legislations apply to businesses and consumers!

GDPR statistics 2018

  • Around 59% of UK businesses know the implications that GDPR will have on them.
  • On average, 73% felt that they were prepared when it came to documents and print management.
  • Only 6% of UK businesses made GDPR a priority. This is compared to 30% in France.
  • CNIL (French data protection regulator) reported a 50% increase in the number of complaints since GDPR came into force on 25th May.

Right of Access

Right of access (or subject access) allows an individual the right to obtain their own personal data. Right of access gives individuals the ability to understand how their data is being used and why their data is being used in such a way. This ensures that their data is being used in a lawful manner.

Individuals have the right to obtain certain information from companies, which includes:

  • a copy of an individual’s personal data
  • confirmation that an individual’s personal data is being processed
  • supplementary information (mainly corresponds to information provided in a privacy notice)

An individual, as we know, is entitled to their own personal data. However, they are not entitled to information about other people. On the other hand, if the information they are trying to obtain is about them as well as someone else, this is acceptable.

As an individual, it’s recommended that you ascertain whether the information you’re requesting is defined as personal data or not. You can check to see what’s classed as personal data (to be sure) here.

Am I a Data Controller or Data Processor?

GDPR applies to data controllers and data processors, but what does this actually mean? Data processors refer to operations performed on data, so when data is stored, collected, recorded, shared, etc. Data controllers are also data processors, the difference being is that they decide what the purpose or reason for processing data activities actually is.

Data Processors

As a data processor, there are legal obligations that GDPR require you to do:

  • Keep and maintain up-to-date personal data records. This includes outlining the details of processing activities and data subject categories. Categories refer to customers, employees, suppliers, and the types of processing – transferring, receiving, disclosing etc.
  • Keep and maintain details of transfer to countries that are outside of the European Economic Area (EEA)
  • Implement and maintain security measures that are appropriate, e.g. encryption

If a data processor is responsible for a data breach, they will have a lot more legal liability compared to the DPA. Individuals can make a direct claim against the data processor, so it’s imperative that you understand your responsibilities as one.

Data Controllers

As a data controller, you are by nature a data processor too. The same GDPR requirements therefore apply. However, the GDPR obligations are placed on you and your business to ensure that contracts with processors are compliant and standards are met.

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Bezos Selfie Controversy Triggers Alarm For Billionaires Worldwide

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Even the world’s richest person couldn’t stop a nude selfie leak.

When Jeff Bezos alleged in a blog post Thursday that he was the victim of blackmail attempts by the publisher of the National Enquirer, he underscored risks particular to billionaires in the digital age.

“The perception among very affluent people is often ‘I have this level of wealth, I’m untouchable,’” said Mark Johnson, chief executive officer of Sovereign Intelligence, a McLean, Virgina-based risk analytics firm. “But the systems they have in place for protecting their personal identifiable information are very weak.”

Ask any family office about its biggest fears and cybersecurity is near the top. Personal protection no longer involves just bodyguards and a top-notch alarm system. The internet age has seen a massive shift in people storing their most sensitive and personal data online, where it’s vulnerable to hacking and intrusion.

‘Absolute Disconnect’

Ultra-wealthy individuals are particularly susceptible because so much of their data are often centralized through family offices, which typically lack the robust firewalls and encryption capabilities of banks and large corporations.

Johnson, a former case officer with the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, said he’s worked with clients with more than $40 billion in assets who had a “Secret Service-type physical security — probably even better — and yet there was an absolute disconnect between that physical security and the digital protection.”

It’s unclear how the tabloid obtained Bezos’s texts. The Amazon.com Inc. founder, who has a net worth of $133.9 billion, said in his blog post that he’d authorized security chief Gavin de Becker “to proceed with whatever budget he needed” to get to the bottom of the leak.

Security experts say potential entry points for a digital invasion are numerous.

‘Legacy Risks’

“We all have devices we carry and they each have their own point of vulnerability,” said Kris Coleman, founder of intelligence-services firm Red Five Security.

Banking information, identity data, even health information and travel schedules can expose someone to a breach. Those in billionaires’ inner circles are a particular risk for the information they have access to and could share, either maliciously or inadvertently.

“Private, affluent families need to consider themselves targets that are on par with nation states,” Coleman said.

Coleman and Johnson are both members of RANE, a network of risk-management professionals from banks, law firms, family offices and corporation.

The wealthy aren’t just at risk of losing money through hacks. Their brands, reputations — or, in family office parlance, “legacy” — also can be damaged. On Tuesday, news website Splinter published a trove of racist emails sent and received by TD Ameritrade Holding Corp. founder Joe Ricketts that included anti-Muslim slurs and conspiracy theories. Ricketts, whose family owns the Chicago Cubs, issued a statement on his personal website, apologizing for remarks “that don’t reflect my value system.”

Protecting Zuckerberg

Providing security services to the growing ranks of the super-rich is an expanding field. Federal agents and military personnel, including former Navy Seals, Secret Service and Mossad agents, SWAT team operators and Scotland Yard detectives, have found second careers protecting billionaires, where they can earn double what they did working for the government.

Facebook Inc. spent $7.3 million in 2017 on personal security for CEO Mark Zuckerberg, an expense the company defended as necessary considering his “position and importance.” Last year, the firm said it would give him an additional $10 million annually to beef up his security. Its executive protection program is run by an ex-Secret Service agent, according to her LinkedIn profile.

Amazon spent $1.6 million last year on security for Bezos, according to regulatory filings. His Bezos Family Foundation also has taken physical precautions. For example, the foundation’s mailing address is a post office box in a nondescript strip mall in the Seattle area.

De Becker, a best-selling author, made his name as a security consultant to Hollywood celebrities and co-created MOSAIC, an assessment tool that was originally used to analyze threats against Supreme Court justices and members of Congress. He describes himself on the firm’s website as “the nation’s leading expert on the protection of public figures.”

Red Five’s Coleman didn’t express shock that Bezos’s racy text messages were vulnerable.

“My message to affluent families: don’t assume you’re OK,” Coleman said. “Because most of them aren’t.”

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Keep an eye out around the house with the Netgear Arlo 6-camera security system on sale for one day only

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This is the largest Arlo camera package and includes all you need to get set up.

Home security is super important, and something you should take seriously. Arlo’s security cameras are a very popular option, and right now you can pick up a 6-pack for just $359.99 at Woot, which is 28% less than the list price and beats the next best price of $405 at Amazon right now.

These cameras can be use both indoors and outdoors, which makes them extremely versatile. The kit is the original Arlo series, not the Pro, but it has been updated particularly to work with Amazon’s Alexa. The base station it comes with allows you to add on more cameras, even more advanced versions like the Arlo Pro 2 if you want. The Arlo camera is 100% wire free and has a fast-charging battery. It has two-way audio thanks to a built-in mic and speaker. You can also use Arlo Smart to add things like customized alerts, zone detection, and the ability to contact emergency services right away.

Unlike many Woot deals, this is for a brand new product and includes a one-year warranty is with the purchase. Shipping is free for Amazon Prime members.

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