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Chameleon Comic

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I’m a longtime fan of Comedy Central’s The Daily Show. When Jon Stewart stepped down as host in 2015, I was sad to see him go. I was also worried for his replacement, Trevor Noah, a South African comedian. Stewart’s style is so unusual that I didn’t see how anyone could fill his shoes—especially someone like Noah, who describes himself as an outsider. As popular as Noah was in South Africa, I didn’t know whether his humor would connect with American audiences.

I’m happy to report that I was wrong. Millions of viewers—myself included—are tuning into The Daily Show because Noah’s show is every bit as good as Stewart’s. His humor has a lightness and optimism that’s refreshing to watch. What’s most impressive is how he uses his outside perspective to his advantage. He’s good at making fun of himself, America, and the rest of the world. His comedy is so universal that it has the power to transcend borders.

Reading Noah’s memoir, Born a Crime, I quickly learned how Noah’s outsider approach has been honed over a lifetime of never quite fitting in. Born to a black South African mother and a white Swiss father in apartheid South Africa, he entered the world as a biracial child in a country where mixed race relationships were forbidden. Noah was not just a misfit, he was (as the title says) “born a crime.”

In South Africa, where race categories are so arbitrary and yet so prominent, Noah never had a group to call his own. As a little boy living under apartheid laws, he couldn’t be seen in public with his white father or his black mother. In public, his father would walk far ahead of him to ensure he wouldn’t be seen with his biracial son. His mother would pose as a maid to make it look like she was just babysitting another family’s child. On the schoolyard, he didn’t fit in with the white kids or the black kids or the kids who were “colored” (the term used in South Africa to describe people of mixed race).

But during his childhood, he quickly discovered that there’s a freedom that comes with being a misfit. A polyglot who speaks English, Afrikaans, Xhosa, Zulu, Tsonga, Tswana, as well as German and Spanish, Noah used his talent for language to bounce from group to group and win acceptance from all of them. One of my favorite stories in the book involves Noah walking down the street when he overhears a group of men speaking in Zulu about how they were plotting to mug “this white guy.” Noah realizes they were referring to him. Noah spins around and announces in perfect Zulu that they should all mug someone together. The Zulu men are startled that Noah speaks Zulu and a tense situation is defused. Noah is immediately accepted as one of their own.

Again and again throughout his childhood, he discovered that language was more powerful than skin color in building connections with other people. “I became a chameleon,” Noah writes. “My color didn’t change, but I could change your perception of my color. If you spoke to me in Zulu, I replied to you in Zulu. If you spoke to me in Tswana, I replied to you in Tswana. Maybe I didn’t look like you, but if I spoke like you, I was you.”

Much of Noah’s story of growing up in South Africa is tragic. His Swiss father moves away. His family is desperately poor. He’s arrested. And in the most shocking moment, his mother is shot by his stepfather. Yet in Noah’s hands, these moving stories are told in a way that will often leave you laughing. His skill for comedy is clearly inherited from his mother. Even after she’s shot in the face, and miraculously survives, she tells her son from her hospital bed to look at the bright side. “’Now you’re officially the best-looking person in the family,’” she jokes.

“If my mother had one goal, it was to free my mind.”— Trevor Noah

In fact, Noah’s mother emerges as the real hero of the book. She’s an extraordinary person who is fiercely independent and raised her son to be the same way. Her greatest gift was to give her son the ability to think for himself and see the world from his own perspective. If my mother had one goal, it was to free my mind,” he writes. Like many fans of Noah’s, I am thankful she did.

source:https://www.gatesnotes.com/Books/Born-a-Crime?WT.mc_id=20170701153100_SummerBooks2017_BornACrime_BG-TW&WT.tsrc=BGTW&linkId=39242747

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TIM COOK WARNS OF ‘DATA-INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX’ IN CALL FOR COMPREHENSIVE US PRIVACY LAWS

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Apple CEO Tim Cook has called for new digital privacy laws in the United States, warning that the collection of huge amounts of personal data by companies is harming society.

Speaking at a privacy conference in Brussels, Cook gave an impassioned and forceful speech. He reiterated familiar talking points like Apple’s commitment to privacy (and, by implication, its rivals lack of commitment) while spelling out public concerns in recent years regarding data collection, surveillance, and manipulation.

Cook said that modern technology has led to the creation of a “data-industrial complex” in which private and everyday information is “weaponized against us with military efficiency.” He added that this mechanism doesn’t just affect individuals, but whole societies.

“Platforms and algorithms that promised to improve our lives can actually magnify our worst human tendencies,” said Cook. “Rogue actors and even governments have taken advantage of user trust to deepen divisions, incite violence, and even undermine our shared sense of what is true and what is false. This crisis is real. It is not imagined, or exaggerated, or crazy.” You can watch the full speech below:

 

Cook did not mention triggers for this crisis, but his comments clearly reference recent events like the Cambridge Analytica scandal, in which the personal data of millions of Facebook users was harvested by a consulting firm with the aim of swaying users’ political views. Similarly, while Cook never mentioned by name tech companies like Facebook and Google, it’s clear that these were targets in his criticism of indiscriminate data collection.

 

Cook has long advocated for strong standards in data privacy, but is now calling for federal regulation too. Alastair MacTaggart, a US privacy campaigner who spearheaded a landmark data privacy law in California said this was a “180-degree turn” for tech companies. “A year ago, they were pushing for self-regulation. But now, they want federal rules, but ones that are as weak as possible,” MacTaggart told Politico.

In his speech in Brussels, attended by policy experts and European Union lawmakers, Cook praised the EU’s “successful implementation” of its new data privacy law, GDPR. This forces companies collecting user information to use the highest possible privacy safeguards by default. It also gives the EU the ability to fine companies up to 4 percent of their global revenue if they misuse user data.

Said Cook: “It is time for the rest of the world […] to follow your lead. We at Apple are in full support of a comprehensive federal privacy law in the United States.” He then went on to outline four key rights that should be enshrined in such legislation: the right to have personal data minimized; the right for users to know what data is collected on them; the right to access that data; and the right for that data to be kept securely.

He also preempted a common criticism in the US that such regulation is a barrier to innovation. “This notion isn’t just wrong, it’s destructive,” said the Apple chief. “Technology’s potential is and always must be rooted in the faith people have in it.”

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JEFF BEZOS UNSEATS BILL GATES ON FORBES LIST OF RICHEST AMERICANS

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For the first time in 24 years, Bill Gates is no longer the richest American on the Forbes 400 list.

Gates lost his standing this year to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, whose net worth is $160 billion, compared with Gates’ $97 billion. That makes the Microsoft founder the second richest American.

Watch this: Amazon boosts its minimum wage to $15 an hour
1:06 

The shakeup isn’t an overnight surprise. In July 2017, Bezos became the richest person in the world, briefly, when his net worth hit just north of $90 billion. It happened again in October 2017 when his net worth clocked in at $93.8 billion compared with Gates’ $88.7 billion. In July 2018, Bloomberg reported that Bezos overtook Gates on its Bloomberg Billionaires Index, which pinned his net worth at $150 billion.

Bezos didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

Other tech figures on the list include Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg coming in at No. 4, Oracle’s Larry Ellison at No. 5, and Google’s Larry Page and Sergey Brin at No. 6 and No. 9, respectively.

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ISACA INSTALLS 2018-2019 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

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Schaumburg, IL, USA (11 June 2018)—ISACA, a global business technology association serving more than 450,000 professionals, installed its 2018-2019 Board of Directors at its Annual General Meeting in Chicago, Saturday 10 June. Rob Clyde was elected to lead ISACA’s board as chair.

“It is an incredible privilege and opportunity to lead this dynamic organization as we help enterprises navigate digital transformation and help individuals transform their careers,” said Clyde. “I am grateful to serve alongside a global professional community that is ensuring the technologies and advancements we embrace are safe, secure, reliable and resilient for both individuals and for enterprises.”

An industry leader within the security and technology space with more than 30 years of experience, Clyde is managing director of Clyde Consulting LLC, which provides board and executive advisory services to cybersecurity software and other companies. In addition to his role as ISACA’s newest chair, Clyde serves as executive chair for White Cloud Security, board director for Titus and executive advisor to HyTrust and BullGuard. He is also a Board Leadership Fellow of the U.S. National Association of Corporate Directors. Prior to his current board and executive advisory work, Clyde served as the chief executive officer of Adaptive Computing, was chief technology officer at Symantec and cofounder of Axent Technologies.

At ISACA, Clyde previously served as board vice chair and director, chaired the board-level ISACA Finance Committee, and served as a member of ISACA’s Strategic Advisory Council, Conference and Education Board and the IT Governance Institute (ITGI) Advisory Panel. He is a frequent speaker at ISACA and other global cyber security, technology and governance conferences. He also serves on the industry advisory council for the Management Information Systems (MIS) Department of Utah State University (USA).

“Rob has served ISACA and our global professional community for many years, and his technical expertise, paired with his business acumen and leadership skills, make him an ideal choice for ISACA board chair,” said ISACA CEO Matt Loeb. “The expanding digital business challenges and risks facing the enterprises and professionals we serve requires innovative thinking, including new expert resources, assessment tools and training solutions. Our 2018-2019 board members are remarkably experienced and dedicated individuals who will contribute to ISACA’s increasing visibility, influence and impact globally.”

Also named to a new leadership role on ISACA’s Board of Directors is Vice-chair Brennan Baybeck, vice president of Global IT Risk Management for Oracle Corp. Baybeck has more than 20 years of experience in IT security, risk, audit and consulting, and has worked in various industries designing, implementing and operating enterprise-wide programs to address global security risks. He has held leadership positions at Sun Microsystems, StorageTek and Qwest Communications.

In total, 13 leaders were installed on the 2018-2019 ISACA Board during the organization’s annual business meeting:

  • Chair Rob Clyde, CISM, managing director of Clyde Consulting LLC
  • Vice Chair Brennan P. Baybeck, CISA, CISM, CRISC, CISSP, vice president of Global IT Risk Management for Oracle Corp.
  • Director Tracey Dedrick, former chief risk officer, Hudson City Bancorp
  • Director Leonard Ong, CISA, CISM, CRISC, CGEIT, CPP, CFE, PMP, CIPM, CIPT, CISSP ISSMP-ISSAP, CSSLP, CITBCM, GCIA, GCIH, GSNA, GCFA, associate director at Merck & Co., Inc.
  • Director R.V. Raghu, CISA, CRISC, director of Versatilist Consulting India Pvt. Ltd.
  • Director Gabriela Reynaga, CISA, CRISC, founder and chief executive officer of Holistics GRC Consultancy
  • Director Gregory Touhill, Brigadier General (ret), USAF, CISM, CISSP, president of Cyxtera Federal Group, Cyxtera Technologies
  • Director Theodore H. Wolff, CISA, head of IT & Security Global Assurance practices in Vanguard’s Global IT & Security Risk and Control group
  • Director Tichaona Zororo, CISA, CISM, CGEIT, CRISC, COBIT 5 Certified Assessor, CIA, CRMA, IT advisory executive with EGIT | Enterprise Governance of IT (Pty) Ltd.
  • Director Matt Loeb, CGEIT, CAE, FASAE, ISACA chief executive officer

Past chairs who remain on the ISACA Board are:

  • Director and Chair (2017-2018) Theresa Grafenstine, CISA, CGEIT, CRISC, CPA, CISSP, CIA, CGMA, CGAP, managing director at Deloitte & Touche LLP
  • Director and Chair (2015-2017) Chris Dimitriadis, Ph.D., CISA, CISM, CRISC, ISO 20000 LA, group director of Information Security for INTRALOT
  • Director and Chair (2014-2015) Robert E Stroud, CGEIT, CRISC, chief product officer at XebiaLabs

The 2018-2019 Board will lead ISACA as it celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2019. Photos and biographies of all board members are available at www.isaca.org/board.

United States and China.

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