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GLASSDOOR JUST NAMED THE TOP 100 CEOS (AND THE RESULTS MIGHT SURPRISE YOU)

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Glassdoor just announced the results of its 2017 Employees’ Choice Awards for the highest-rated CEOs leading companies with 1,000 or more employees in North America and parts of Europe. The results are based on the anonymous feedback of employees who complete a company review of their CEO’s leadership.

While some of the CEOs are household names (everyone’s heard of Elon Musk, No. 8, and Mark Zuckerberg, No. 10), many of the CEOs are relatively unknown to the general public. Regardless, each has earned a spot on the Glassdoor list.

Here, then, are the top-100 CEOs for 2017. Is yours on the list?

1. The Clorox Company
Benno Dorer​

CEO Approval Rating: 99%

2. World Wide Technology
Jim Kavanaugh

CEO Approval Rating: 99%

3. Boston Scientific
Michael F. Mahoney

CEO Approval Rating: 99%

4. Memorial Sloan Kettering
Craig B. Thompson

CEO Approval Rating: 99%

5. Fast Enterprises
Martin Rankin

CEO Approval Rating: 99%

6. Nvidia
Jen-Hsun Huang

CEO Approval Rating: 99%

7. Bain & Company
Bob Bechek

CEO Approval Rating: 98%

8. SpaceX
Elon Musk

CEO Approval Rating: 98%

9. HubSpot
Brian Halligan

CEO Approval Rating: 98%

10. Facebook
Mark Zuckerberg

CEO Approval Rating: 98%

11. Paylocity
Steve Beauchamp

CEO Approval Rating: 98%

12. McKinsey & Company
Dominic Barton

CEO Approval Rating: 97%

13. Intuit
Brad Smith

CEO Approval Rating: 97%

14. Power Home Remodeling
Corey Schiller & Asher Raphael

CEO Approval Rating: 97%

15. Salesforce
Marc Benioff

CEO Approval Rating: 97%

16. H E B
Charles C. Butt

CEO Approval Rating: 97%

17. Google
Sundar Pichai

CEO Approval Rating: 96%

18. United Airlines
Oscar Munoz

CEO Approval Rating: 96%

19. Adobe
Shantanu Narayen

CEO Approval Rating: 96%

20. T-Mobile
John Legere

CEO Approval Rating: 96%

21. Enterprise Holdings
Pamela M. (Pam) Nicholson

CEO Approval Rating: 96%

22. NBCUniversal
Stephen B. Burke

CEO Approval Rating: 96%

23. CDW
Thomas E. Richards

CEO Approval Rating: 96%

24. SAP
Bill McDermott

CEO Approval Rating: 96%

25. Morrison Healthcare
Tim Pierce

CEO Approval Rating: 96%

26. Bloomberg L.P.
Michael R. Bloomberg

CEO Approval Rating: 95%

27. Nestlé Purina
Joseph R. Sivewright

CEO Approval Rating: 95%

28. QuikTrip
Chet Cadieux III

CEO Approval Rating: 95%

29. Microsoft
Satya Nadella

CEO Approval Rating: 95%

30. Johnson & Johnson
Alex Gorsky

CEO Approval Rating: 95%

31. Juniper Networks
Rami Rahim

CEO Approval Rating: 95%

32. Yardi Systems
Anant Yardi

CEO Approval Rating: 94%

33. Capital One
Richard D. Fairbank

CEO Approval Rating: 94%

34. Cheesecake Factory
David Overton

CEO Approval Rating: 94%

35. LinkedIn
Jeff Weiner

CEO Approval Rating: 94%

36. In-N-Out Burger
Lynsi Snyder

CEO Approval Rating: 94%

37. Chick-fil-A
Dan T. Cathy

CEO Approval Rating: 94%

38. Square
Jack Dorse
y
CEO Approval Rating: 94%

39. Expedia
Dara Khosrowshahi

CEO Approval Rating: 94%

40. Deloitte
Cathy Engelbert

CEO Approval Rating: 94%

41. Republic Services
Donald W. (Don) Slager

CEO Approval Rating: 94%

42. Slalom Consulting
Brad Jackson

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

43. Accenture
Pierre Nanterme

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

44. Ryan LLC
G. Brint Ryan

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

45. Sephora
Calvin McDonald

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

46. Paychex
Martin Mucci

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

47. Travelers
Alan D. Schnitzer

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

48. Zillow
Spencer Rascoff

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

49. Hilton
Christopher Nassetta

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

50. Monsanto Company
Hugh Grant

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

51. Texas Instruments
Rich Templeton

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

52. Nike
Mark G. Parker

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

53. Apple
Tim Cook

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

54. Kronos Incorporated
Aron J. Ain

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

55. Delta Air Lines
Ed Bastian

CEO Approval Rating: 93%

56. CBRE
Robert E. Sulentic

CEO Approval Rating: 92%

57. Stryker
Kevin A. Lobo

CEO Approval Rating: 92%

58. Ikea
Peter Agnefjall

CEO Approval Rating: 92%

59. Fannie Mae
Tim Mayopoulos

CEO Approval Rating: 92%

60. John Deere
Samuel Allen

CEO Approval Rating: 92%

61. Topgolf
Ken May

CEO Approval Rating: 92%

62. AbbVie
Richard A. Gonzalez

CEO Approval Rating: 92%

63. TD
Bharat Masrani

CEO Approval Rating: 92%

64. Bayada Home Health Care
J. Mark Baiada

CEO Approval Rating: 92%

65. General Motors
Mary Barra

CEO Approval Rating: 91%

66. Booz Allen Hamilton
Horacio D. Rozanski

CEO Approval Rating: 91%

67. Northwell Health
Michael J. Dowling

CEO Approval Rating: 91%

68. Kaiser Permanente
Bernard J. Tyson

CEO Approval Rating: 91%

69. Discover
David W. Nelms

CEO Approval Rating: 91%

70. EY
Mark Weinberger

CEO Approval Rating: 91%

71. BASF Corporation
Wayne T. Smith

CEO Approval Rating: 91%

72. Sport Clips
Gordon B. Logan

CEO Approval Rating: 91%

73. Fidelity Investments
Abby Johnson

CEO Approval Rating: 91%

74. Goldman Sachs
Lloyd C. Blankfein

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

75. Prudential
John R. Strangfeld

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

76. Procter & Gamble
David S. Taylor

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

77. Best Buy
Hubert Joly

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

78. Raytheon
Thomas A. Kennedy

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

79. Cardinal Health
George S. Barrett

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

80. Greystar
Bob Faith

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

81. Northern Trust
Rick Waddell

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

82. BlackRock
Laurence D. Fink

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

83. VMware
Pat Gelsinger

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

84. JetBlue
Robin Hayes

CEO Approval Rating: 90%

85. J.P. Morgan
Jamie Dimon

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

86. REI
Jerry Stritzke

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

87. eBay
Devin Wenig

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

88. Costco Wholesale
Craig Jelinek

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

89. Northrop Grumman
Wesley G. Bush

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

90. Northwestern Mutual
John E. Schlifske

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

91. Rockwell Collins
Kelly Ortberg

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

92. Cox Communications
Pat Esser

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

93. Progressive Insurance
Tricia Griffith

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

94. Gartner
Gene Hall

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

95. SAIC
Anthony Moraco

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

96. Southwest Airlines
Gary C. Kelly

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

97. UniFirst
Ronald D. Croatti

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

98. Nordstrom
Blake W. Nordstrom

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

99. Lockheed Martin
Marillyn Hewson

CEO Approval Rating: 89%

100. Stitch Fix
Katrina Lake
CEO Approval Rating: 89%

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WORD PROCESSOR PIONEER EVELYN BEREZIN DIES AGED 93

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The woman who created and sold what many recognise as the world’s first word processor has died aged 93.

Evelyn Berezin called the device the Data Secretary when, in 1971, her company Redactron launched the product.

She grew Redactron from nine employees to close to 500 and was named one of the US’s top leaders by BusinessWeek magazine in the year she sold it, 1976.

She had earlier built one of the original computerised airline reservation systems.

The innovation – which matched customers and available seats – was tested by United Airlines in 1962.

According to the Computer History Museum, it had a one-second response time and worked for 11 years without any central system failures.

The technology vied with the rival Sabre system, developed by American Airlines, for being the first of its kind.

In addition, Ms Berezin helped pioneer other types of special-purpose computing including:

  • an automated banking system
  • a weapons-targeting calculator for the US Defense Department
  • terminals for a horse-racing track that monitored how much money was being bet on each animal

Screenless editing

In an interview in 2015, Ms Berezin explained that she had decided to set up her own business in the mid-60s after coming to the conclusion that her prospects were limited so long as she was employed by someone else.

She said that she had initially considered developing an electronic cash register but ultimately opted to create what would become known as a word processor instead.

She said: “6% of all the people in the United States who worked were secretaries.

“At the time we started, which was in 1968 to 1969, nobody really had any desk-type computers on which you could write a word-processing program that a secretary would use.

“I know that desktop computers seem obvious now but it wasn’t so then.”

At the time, the nearest equivalent was a machine by IBM called the MT/ST – a typewriter with magnetic tape recording and playback facilities.

IBM’s marketing referred to a “word processor”, but the machine relied on relay switches rather than computer chips, had been targeted at military equipment makers rather than the wider business market, and in Ms Berezin’s mind was “klutzy”.

“We were committed to building a computer to run our system and we knew that we had to use integrated circuits because it was the only way we could make it small enough and cheap enough and reliable enough to sell,” Ms Berezin said.

Her machine – which stood about 1m (3ft 3in) tall – featured a keyboard, cassette drives, control electronics and a printer.

It could record and play back what the user had typed, allowing it to be edited or reprinted.

The original model lacked a monitor, and soon faced competition from a rival, the Lexitron, which did.

But later versions of the Data Secretary did include a screen.

Data SecretaryImage copyrightEYEVINE/NEW YORK TIMES
Image captionSome versions of the Data Secretary did feature a screen

Sparks and water

The project nearly ended in disaster.

Ms Berezin had intended to buy the processors required from Intel, which had gone into business in 1968. But it said it was too busy dealing with orders for its memory chips.

The solution was that Redactron had to design some of the chips required itself and provide the schematics to two manufacturers.

There were further problems with a prototype when it was put on display in a New York hotel for reporters to see.

The issue was that in dry weather, it was prone to a build-up of static electricity, which caused sparks to fly between its circuits, preventing it from working.

“To our horror it was a dry day and the engineers were setting this non-working machine up for our big story,” Ms Berezin said.

“Ed Wolf [our head of engineering brought] a full pail of water and without a word to anyone throws the pail of water over the whole thick carpet in the room.

“The water sank into the carpet, which stayed damp for three or four hours, and the machine worked perfectly.”

AdvertImage copyright@MKIRSCHENBAUM

The first production machine was delivered to a customer in September 1971. And over the following year, Redactron sold or rented more than 770 others, excluding demo units.

Over the following years, demand grew but the company’s finances came under strain, in part because of high interest rates and a recession that meant clients wanted to rent rather than buy its products.

“We were told by the bank to sell the company and they had somebody they knew who was interested,” said Ms Berezin.

“At the time, I was distraught about it.”

She went to work for the purchaser, the business equipment-maker Burroughs Corporation. But it proved to be an ill match.

“I was not one of them – I told them what I thought – a loud woman they did not know how to deal with,” she said.

“So, they disconnected and so did I.”

Ms Berezin left the company around 1980, after which she became involved in venture capital and sat on other companies’ boards before becoming involved with Stony Brook University.

The New York Times reported that a nephew had confirmed she had died on 8 December in Manhattan after turning down treatment for cancer.

One of the remaining Data Secretary word processors can be seen on display at the Computer History Museum in California.

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TIM COOK WARNS OF ‘DATA-INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX’ IN CALL FOR COMPREHENSIVE US PRIVACY LAWS

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Apple CEO Tim Cook has called for new digital privacy laws in the United States, warning that the collection of huge amounts of personal data by companies is harming society.

Speaking at a privacy conference in Brussels, Cook gave an impassioned and forceful speech. He reiterated familiar talking points like Apple’s commitment to privacy (and, by implication, its rivals lack of commitment) while spelling out public concerns in recent years regarding data collection, surveillance, and manipulation.

Cook said that modern technology has led to the creation of a “data-industrial complex” in which private and everyday information is “weaponized against us with military efficiency.” He added that this mechanism doesn’t just affect individuals, but whole societies.

“Platforms and algorithms that promised to improve our lives can actually magnify our worst human tendencies,” said Cook. “Rogue actors and even governments have taken advantage of user trust to deepen divisions, incite violence, and even undermine our shared sense of what is true and what is false. This crisis is real. It is not imagined, or exaggerated, or crazy.” You can watch the full speech below:

 

Cook did not mention triggers for this crisis, but his comments clearly reference recent events like the Cambridge Analytica scandal, in which the personal data of millions of Facebook users was harvested by a consulting firm with the aim of swaying users’ political views. Similarly, while Cook never mentioned by name tech companies like Facebook and Google, it’s clear that these were targets in his criticism of indiscriminate data collection.

 

Cook has long advocated for strong standards in data privacy, but is now calling for federal regulation too. Alastair MacTaggart, a US privacy campaigner who spearheaded a landmark data privacy law in California said this was a “180-degree turn” for tech companies. “A year ago, they were pushing for self-regulation. But now, they want federal rules, but ones that are as weak as possible,” MacTaggart told Politico.

In his speech in Brussels, attended by policy experts and European Union lawmakers, Cook praised the EU’s “successful implementation” of its new data privacy law, GDPR. This forces companies collecting user information to use the highest possible privacy safeguards by default. It also gives the EU the ability to fine companies up to 4 percent of their global revenue if they misuse user data.

Said Cook: “It is time for the rest of the world […] to follow your lead. We at Apple are in full support of a comprehensive federal privacy law in the United States.” He then went on to outline four key rights that should be enshrined in such legislation: the right to have personal data minimized; the right for users to know what data is collected on them; the right to access that data; and the right for that data to be kept securely.

He also preempted a common criticism in the US that such regulation is a barrier to innovation. “This notion isn’t just wrong, it’s destructive,” said the Apple chief. “Technology’s potential is and always must be rooted in the faith people have in it.”

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JEFF BEZOS UNSEATS BILL GATES ON FORBES LIST OF RICHEST AMERICANS

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For the first time in 24 years, Bill Gates is no longer the richest American on the Forbes 400 list.

Gates lost his standing this year to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, whose net worth is $160 billion, compared with Gates’ $97 billion. That makes the Microsoft founder the second richest American.

Watch this: Amazon boosts its minimum wage to $15 an hour
1:06 

The shakeup isn’t an overnight surprise. In July 2017, Bezos became the richest person in the world, briefly, when his net worth hit just north of $90 billion. It happened again in October 2017 when his net worth clocked in at $93.8 billion compared with Gates’ $88.7 billion. In July 2018, Bloomberg reported that Bezos overtook Gates on its Bloomberg Billionaires Index, which pinned his net worth at $150 billion.

Bezos didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

Other tech figures on the list include Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg coming in at No. 4, Oracle’s Larry Ellison at No. 5, and Google’s Larry Page and Sergey Brin at No. 6 and No. 9, respectively.

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