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Moto Mods aren’t dead yet, if this Moto Z4 leak is to be believed

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Motorola’s Moto Z4 phone has leaked, and while it isn’t much of a surprise that the company would make a fourth iteration of its flagship Android phone, it’s the first indication we’ve seen that its Moto Mod initiative may still be alive and kicking — because you can clearly see the copper contacts for its modular Moto Mods accessories on the back of this alleged phone.

The release of new Moto Mods has slowed over the past couple years, so much so that it was unclear if the initiative had a future. After all, the last big wave of new Mods came along with 2017’s Moto Z2 Play. Since then, a promising fold-out keyboard developed by a third-party company was canceled in 2018. In an interview with Engadget at the time, Motorola insisted that it would continue working on Mods for the foreseeable future.

But other than the 5G Moto Mod, which is now available for preorder and only compatible with Verizon’s yet-to-launch consumer 5G network, we’re not seeing any indication that another big wave of Mods is coming. So, it’s possible that the Moto Mods attachment point may exist simply to appease past customers instead of attracting new ones, but we’ll have to wait until more information leaks out to get a bigger, better picture.

A few other rumored details have surfaced from publication 91mobiles. The 2019 model may use a Snapdragon 855 processor, which would go a long way to make amends with phone enthusiasts who felt burned by last year’s Moto Z3. It used the older Snapdragon 835 while other flagship phones opted for the Snapdragon 845.

The Moto Z4 pictured in the leak appears to have a teardrop notch, new to the Z line but similar to the one found in this year’s Moto G7. With regards to the lack of a visible fingerprint sensor in the photo, Moto may opt for an in-display fingerprint reader instead of embedding one in the side of the phone, which it did with the Moto Z3. When he reviewed the Z3 last year, Chris Welch said that the side-mounted reader was “awkward to use,” and while an in-display option might reduce the awkwardness, it may not necessarily be better. The Samsung Galaxy S10’s in-display solution ended up being “slower and more finicky” than what it used before, though Moto may figure out a way to improve it.

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The Future

Technology + Engineering = The Future

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With the diversity of advanced technologies available for growers to save labor, automate processes, and control their greenhouse environments, there’s one important human element that’s missing from most operations: a greenhouse engineer.

“We’ve seen growers shut down possible technologies because they don’t understand how to use them, or they don’t use a system to its full potential” says Peter Ling, associate professor at The Ohio State University (OSU) Department of Food, Agriculture, and Biological Engineering. “And, if technology breaks down, they don’t know how to fix it.”

These are driving forces behind a new specialization at the Agricultural Technical Institute (ATI) in Wooster, Ohio. The two-year Greenhouse Engineering Technology specialization is the only one of its kind in the country, and it’s a partnership between ATI and OSU. The degree merges studies in traditional horticulture technology, engineering, and new greenhouse technology.

“We want to train our students as technicians so they can help growers,” Ling says. “They understand horticulture and technology. They understand how to use advanced computer controls to maintain an ideal environment for plants.”

Greenhouse Engineering Technology students learn to use sensors, control strategies, actuators, and electro-mechanical equipment. They also work with smart irrigation systems, pesticide application equipment, and materials handling systems.

“To us, the key is for growers to understand the potential of the technology and to be able to use it to its full potential,” Ling says, relating that one student in last year’s graduating class had four job offers on the table. “We are getting a great response from the industry. It shows us that we need to train more students to supply the demand.”

Source: https://www.greenhousegrower.com/sponsor/basf/technology-engineering-the-future/

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The Future

What The Future Of Farming Will Look Like Thanks To Technology

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As the food industry continues to evolve, advanced technology is becoming a more prominent part of farming. In recent interviews, three experts shared their ideas about the future of farming and tech. Ofir Schlam, CEO and co-founder of Taranis, Jason Green, the CEO and co-founder of Edenworks, and Kevin Brown, CEO and co-founder of Innit, discussed the changes that will happen.

“In 2017, tech startups in the agriculture sphere raised $670 million to develop software management, big data analytics, automated equipment and other cutting-edge tools that help farmers grow crops with scientific precision. While companies face several challenges, such as imaging limitations and a lack of data management, farmers are still keen to introduce technologies to improve farm management. Between today’s labor shortages and the world’s rising demand for food, farmers must look to technology to predict and prevent threats to millions of acres of crops worldwide,” Schlam says.

Canola field. Photo by Martin Schutt/picture alliance via Getty Images photo credit: picture alliance via Getty Images

Canola field. Photo by Martin Schutt/picture alliance via Getty Images photo credit: picture alliance via Getty Images GETTY

Brown believes that every step of the food journey, from farm to fork, will be influenced by technology. Smart supply chains will track and report where the food came from and how it was handled, down to the individual package. Blockchain tech will enhance trust as food information is captured and shared at every point of the journey. New sensors will allow people to rapidly scan food and measure it down to the molecular level, ensuring better quality and transparency.

Schlam agrees and sees artificial intelligence (AI) as an important component of the future. While current technology is far more advanced than the tools previous generations used, there needs to be a renewed focus on technology using AI capabilities to make massive amounts of data useful and actionable. The future of farming will be dependent on precision technology, the adoption of automated practices, indoor urbanized farming and more. All of these innovations will help to propagate the growth of farming crops. The ultimate goal is to create a synergy between farming and technology that works with the forces of nature to maximize production.

Working with nature and not against it is a crucial part, according to Green. “The basis of our technology is ecosystems. It is our belief that the more we can replicate the biodiversity of nature, and the microbial diversity that results, the faster and more healthy our plants and fish will grow. Future farms will have an increasing focus on microbial health. Generic sequencing of the microbiome will help us understand what microbial communities exist in our system at any given point enabling us to understand the health of our farm’s immune system before disease actually hits,” Green explains.

Green’s company is focused on making indoor farming cost competitive with field farming. He believes it is the only way to make the sustainability benefits of aquaponic farming truly widespread and impactful. As opposed to the Industrial Revolution, which created cheap products through brute force, synthetic chemicals and backbreaking labor, he thinks it is possible to fulfill this mission by looking to nature to do most of the work for people. “A mantra that we use internally is that by harnessing nature’s complexity, we share its abundance,” Green shares.

Brown looks at the big picture and sees tech innovations spreading from the farm to the table. Increasingly, food recommendations will be made by software based on personalized nutrition. Users will simply indicate their preferences, and the right items will show up. Machine learning advances in voice and vision will create more seamless assistance with shopping, managing food and cooking. New cooking technologies powered by automated cooking programs will enable vastly improved quality of home-cooked meals while reducing stress and time requirements.

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/lanabandoim/2019/05/31/what-the-future-of-farming-will-look-like-thanks-to-technology/#4c2c8f135941

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The Future

This is what the Samsung Galaxy Note10 will look like

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Yesterday a schematic of the Galaxy Note10’s rear camera arrangement leaked, and we showed you a render approximating what that would look like on the back of the upcoming device. What about the front, though?

Since the Galaxy S10+ comes with two sensors in the punch-hole screen cutout, you’d expect the Note10 to have at least that number of cameras tucked in there, but apparently you’d be wrong. Both the Note10 and the Note10 Pro (yes, we’re getting two models this yearfour if you count the 5G-enabled offshoots) will only employ one front-facing camera.

This information comes from Ice universe, a leakster that has provided reliable info in the past. And it is the same person who has confirmed that this render of the upcoming Note10 is in fact correct. This, then, is what Samsung’s next flagship smartphone will look like.

The render was created by Ben Geskin and is not a leaked image, but we should probably expect it to be extremely close to the official promo pictures. Once again the new vertical arrangement of the rear cameras is confirmed, with two islands – a bigger one towards the left edge, and a smaller one to its right, housing the LED flash, ToF camera, and possibly a flood illuminator too. Over in the main hump, expect to see a wide, ultra-wide, and tele lens, and don’t be surprised if these are identical to those in the Galaxy S10+.

It’s good to see Samsung ditching its horizontally aligned camera island abominations for the Note10, but apparently the new design is controversial. So what do you think? Does it look better than what we got for the S10+ and S10 5G?

Source: https://www.gsmarena.com/this_is_what_the_samsung_galaxy_note10_will_look_like-news-37297.php

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