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Indian Redmi Note 5 gets its first MIUI update in over 4 months

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edmi Note 5 and Note 5 Pro were among the most successful Xiaomi smartphones sold in India. By the fourth month after launch, Xiaomi had managed to sell 5 million units of the two smartphones combined in the country. Redmi Note 5 Pro, the more cherished and powerful one of the two, has received a fair treatment including two major OS updates – Android 8.1 Oreo and Android 9 Pie – while a system-wide dark mode is currently being tested. The lower-powered Redmi Note 5, on the other hand, has not received any update since November last year. But, if you’re using an Indian Redmi Note 5, there’s good news for you as Xiaomi is now turning its attention back to the smartphone and releasing a new update after almost five months of waiting.

Redmi Note 5 XDA Forums

The Indian units of Redmi Note 5 (codenamed “vince”) are now getting updated from MIUI build number 10.0.4 to MIUI 10.2.1. Based on Android 8.1 Oreo, the update is primarily aimed at fixing a host of issues, which seem to have deterred Xiaomi from working on new features for the device. Here are all the major bugs fixed in this update:

  • Phone
    • Notifications about incoming calls will no longer disappear if you’re in a video call
    • Incorrect UI elements for switching between the front and the back cameras during video calls is now fixed
    • Those who couldn’t send SMSes during conference calls will now be able to do so
  • Lockscreen, notification shade, and status bar
    • The overlapping of “return to call” button and time has been fixed
    • You can now select which apps show floating notifications and restricts the ones you want to hide
    • The issue of the fingerprint scanner not unlocking the phone during calls has been fixed
  • Settings
    • Missed call notifications will now come with vibrations when you switch of DND mode
  • Security
    • The security patch has been updated (although no mention of the exact patch in the changelog)

As mentioned earlier, the update is specific to Indian units of the Redmi Note 5 and should reach users in phases. There’s a faster way to get the update and it is officially supported. Just download one of the packages from below and install the update with the Mi Updater tool within Settings on your Note 5. You can also use Mi Flash Tool to install the update using the Fastboot ROM, which is also linked below.

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Research

New LRC Study Evaluates the Effectiveness of Apple’s iPad Night Shift Application

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The light emitted by portable electronic devices (PEDs), particularly when used at night, has drawn a great deal of interest among sleep researchers, healthcare professionals, and the media. Research shows that exposure to light at night (LAN) may be associated with poor sleep and may lead to diminished alertness and performance throughout the day. Exposure to LAN can also acutely suppress melatonin, a hormone produced at night and in darkness, which tells the body it is nighttime. The short-wavelength “blue” light emitted by electronics can be especially disruptive to melatonin production, and the proximity to the eye when PEDs are in use only aggravates the threat to getting a good night’s sleep.In an effort to address this problem, in 2016 Apple Inc. released the Night Shift application for its line of PEDs, notably including the iPad, which in the third quarter of 2017 was the world’s most popular computer tablet and accounted for 25% of the year’s global tablet sales. The Night Shift mode permits users to change the screen’s color to “more warm” (i.e., less blue light) or “less warm” (i.e., more blue light), without necessarily changing its brightness. A new study from the Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute investigated the effectiveness of Night Shift for lessening the impacts of nighttime iPad use on melatonin suppression, a marker of the circadian system. The study, to be published in 2018 by the peer-reviewed journal Lighting Research & Technology, is currently in press and is now available to subscribers online.In the study, LRC researchers Rohan Nagare, Barbara Plitnick, and Mariana G. Figueiro recruited 12 young adults to view iPads between 11:00 p.m. and 1:00 a.m. on four separate nights under four experimental conditions. One of the study’s conditions deliberately suppressed participants’ melatonin levels by delivering a blue light intervention to the participants’ eyes via light-emitting diode (LED) goggles designed by the LRC. A second condition occurred in dim light (< 5 lux), where participants wore orange goggles that filtered blue light, which served as the control for the baseline melatonin suppression calculations. The study also used two spectrally distinct lighting interventions for the iPad that were generated by adjusting the ‘color temperature’ slide control of the device’s Night Shift application to either extreme of its more warm (2837 K) or less warm (5997 K) range. LRC researchers independently measured the correlated color temperature (CCT) of each Night Shift setting as part of the study. Participants exposed to the Night Shift Low CCT (more warm) and Night Shift High CCT (less warm) interventions wore lensless eyeglasses frames fitted with an LRC-developed circadian light meter called a Dimesimeter, which measured eye-level light exposures. Data from the Dimesimeter was used to calculate the circadian stimulus (CS) received by participants during the experiment. Using the LRC’s free, downloadable CS Calculator, LRC researchers were able to closely predict the amount of melatonin suppression that was recorded for the participants.Results showed that all three lighting interventions significantly suppressed melatonin over the two hours of each study night. More importantly, there was no significant difference between the effectiveness of the two Night Shift settings. For a two-hour exposure to the iPad, the LRC measured: – 23% melatonin suppression on regular settings (not using Night Shift; from previous Wood et al. study) -19% melatonin suppression while using Night Shift High CCT -12% melatonin suppression while using Night Shift Low CCT  The study’s main takeaway is that changing screen color alone is insufficient for limiting the impact of PEDs on melatonin levels in the evening, and that screen brightness should also be reduced. Overall, the results of this LRC study may be useful for developers, manufacturers, and users of self-luminous electronic devices by emphasizing considerations other than light spectrum when designing and using display applications for health and wellbeing. In addition to spectral properties, LRC researchers recommend that users also consider lowering the amount of light emitted by PEDs by keeping light levels low, limiting the use of PEDs to one-hour sessions, and avoiding exposures starting at least two hours before bedtime. Better yet, LRC researchers recommend turning off PEDs at least two hours prior to desired bedtimes. Even if melatonin is not suppressed during this interval, these devices can be alerting to the brain and, as a result, can disrupt sleep.
About the Lighting Research Center
The Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is the world’s leading center for lighting research and education. Established in 1988 by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), the LRC conducts research in light and human health, transportation lighting and safety, solid-state lighting, energy efficiency, and plant health. LRC lighting scientists with multidisciplinary expertise in research, technology, design, and human factors, collaborate with a global network of leading manufacturers and government agencies, developing innovative lighting solutions for projects that range from the Boeing 787 Dreamliner to U.S. Navy submarines to hospital neonatal intensive-care units. In 1990, the LRC became the first university research center to offer graduate degrees in lighting and today, offers a M.S. in lighting and a Ph.D. to educate future leaders in lighting. Learn more at www.lrc.rpi.edu.About Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Founded in 1824, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is America’s first technological research university. Rensselaer encompasses five schools, 32 research centers, more than 145 academic programs, and a dynamic community made up of more than 7,900 students and more than 100,000 living alumni. Rensselaer faculty and alumni include more than 145 National Academy members, six members of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, six National Medal of Technology winners, five National Medal of Science winners, and a Nobel Prize winner in Physics. With nearly 200 years of experience advancing scientific and technological knowledge, Rensselaer remains focused on addressing global challenges with a spirit of ingenuity and collaboration.

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Reviews

My Samsung Galaxy Fold screen broke after just a day

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Look closely at the picture above, and you can see a small bulge right on the crease of my Galaxy Fold review unit. It’s just enough to slightly distort the screen, and I can feel it under my finger. There’s something pressing up against the screen at the hinge, right there in the crease. My best guess is that it’s a piece of debris, something harder than lint for sure. It’s possible that it’s something else, though, like the hinge itself on a defective unit pressing up on the screen.

It’s a distressing thing to discover just two days after receiving my review unit. More distressing is that the bulge eventually pressed sharply enough into the screen to break it. You can see the telltale lines of a broken OLED converging on the spot where the bulge is.

Whatever happened, it certainly wasn’t because I have treated this phone badly. I’ve done normal phone stuff, like opening and closing the hinge and putting it in my pocket. We did stick a tiny piece of molding clay on the back of the phone yesterday to prop it up for a video shoot, which is something we do in every phone video shoot. So perhaps a tiny piece of that snuck into a gap on the back of the hinge and then around or through its cogs until it lodged in between the screen and the hinge. It’d be sort of like Charlie Chaplin getting caught in the gears in Modern Times.

Or maybe something got in another one of the little gaps somewhere else. Or maybe it was pieces from the hinge itself breaking loose and working their way up into the screen. I don’t know. I just know that the screen is broken, and there was no obvious proximate cause for the bulge that broke it. I certainly haven’t used it on a beach or shook it in a bag of chips or anything wild. Just normal use.I DON’T KNOW WHAT HAPPENED; I JUST KNOW THE SCREEN IS BROKEN

We’ve seen worries about scratches on expensive phones and debris breaking the keyboard on expensive MacBooks, but a piece of debris distorting the screen on a $1,980 phone after one day of use feels like it’s on an entirely different level.

I reached out to Samsung right away to get a statement, but it took about 24 hours for the company to put one together. Here it is, and the gist is that Samsung is looking into our unit and also warning users not to try to peel off the protective layer on the top of the screen.

Also, I have, however, received a replacement review unit from Samsung. I think the first one is on a jet to South Korea for Samsung’s engineers to take apart and diagnose.

By the way, it appears I’m not the only reviewing the phone who has had a problem with the screen. Here’s Steve Kovach:

Mark Gurman of Bloomberg also broke his, but that’s perhaps because he removed a protective layer that looks like a screen protector, but definitely isn’t meant to be removed.

And here’s Marques “MKBHD” Brownlee confirming he, too, had to get a replacement unit after peeling off the outer layer (which, again, wasn’t our issue):

It looks like retail units of the Galaxy Fold will include a warning about not removing the protective layer, but review units don’t seem to have included this one:

Like everybody else, I said in my original hands-on with the Galaxy Fold that I absolutely am able to see the crease between the two sides of the screen. But when I’m using the phone, I don’t actually notice it much. It’s easy to talk about it as a small first-generation compromise you have to make for what is otherwise a wonder of engineering: a tablet that folds in half.

I took a photo in my hotel room when the bulge first appeared. The next morning, that same bulge finally broke the screen.

Another thing people are worried about is the plastic screen scratching or picking up nicks easily. There are already a couple of minor dings on my unit, but they’re minor enough that I didn’t see them until our photographer zoomed way in to show them to me. If you look closely at the edges of the screen, there’s a sort of built-in screen protector on the front of the device. Samsung calls it a “polymer layer.” It is not designed to be removed. (Please don’t try it if you get your hands on a Fold.)

But while the crease and the nicks feel like compromises you could live with, a mysterious bulge that breaks the screen is something else entirely — especially one that appears just a day after pretty normal use. It’s a problem that is unacceptable on a phone that costs this much.

Every phone with movable parts is going to have more points of failure than a fully sealed, static phone. So it’s natural to say that you need to treat it with more care than usual. Before I saw this bulge, my impression was that this phone was much more durable than I expected. The hinge always felt solid and well-built. That impression of (relative) durability is obviously as broken as the flexing screen now.

If I’m right and it’s debris, it means that not only do you need to treat your phone with care, but you also have to worry about stuff getting in underneath the screen. If I’m wrong and it’s some kind of defect in the hardware, well… then we’re in entirely different territory. Either way: yikes.

Hopefully Samsung lets us know the results after it takes my original review unit apart to see what happened.

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Industry

LG V50 ThinQ 5G launch in South Korea delayed

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LG announced earlier today that it delayed the South Korea launch of its 5G-capable V50 ThinQ. The phone was originally slated to launch in South Korea this Friday, April 19.

The delay is due to LG wanting to further optimize the Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 chipset and Qualcomm X50 5G modem inside of the V50. LG also said it’s working with Qualcomm and South Korean carriers to improve 5G service and phone interoperability.

LG V50 ThinQ 5G price & release date: What we know so far (it’s not much)

LG didn’t say when the V50 will be available in South Korea. Android Authority reached out to LG for comment on a new release date and whether the delayed launch in South Korea will affect the U.S. launch, but did not receive a response by press time.

The delay comes at a bad time for LG, which saw rival Samsung launch its first 5G smartphone April 5 in South Korea. LG likely had hoped to use the Galaxy S10 5G’s launch momentum for its own 5G smartphone, but now we don’t know when the V50 will debut.

That said, LG might have dodged a very big bullet by delaying the V50’s launch. Business Koreareported last week that Galaxy S10 5G owners have struggled with poor 5G connectivity and an inability to switch to 4G LTE. Samsung pushed out an update that supposedly addressed the issues, but the update didn’t help much.

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