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WhatsApp scam offers ‘1,000GB free Internet’

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It’s one of the most popular apps on both Android and iOS, so it’s no surprise that WhatsApp is often targeted by crafty scammers.

The latest scam offers users 1,000GB free Internet – but sadly that’s an offer that’s simply too good to be true.

Researchers from ESET have highlighted the dangers of the scam, which tries to trick users into clicking on a link to a fake WhatsApp website.

In a blog about the scam, researcher Luis Lubeck explained: “What strikes us right off the bat here is that the URL that comes with the message is not an official WhatsApp domain.

The scam offers you 1,000 GB free Internet (Image: ESET)

“Even though businesses may sometimes run promotions through third parties, the rule of thumb here is to check on the company’s website to make sure any promotion is real and valid.

“Nevertheless, if you were to click on the link, you would be taken to a page that invites you to answer a series of questions in the form of a survey – ranging from how you found the offer to your opinion on the app.”

If you do complete the survey, you’ll then be urged to pass the offer along to at least 30 more people in order to quality for the big ‘reward.’

The scam message (Image: ESET)

Mr Lubeck wrote: “Needless to say, this is merely a way to boost the campaign’s reach.”

Thankfully, the scam isn’t linked to any malicious software, so is unlikely to be dangerous to users.

Instead, the scammer’s goal is click fraud – a monetisation scheme that relies on racking up fake ad clicks that bring revenues.

Source: https://www.mirror.co.uk/tech/whatsapp-scam-offers-1000gb-free-18803606

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Security

Kaspersky raises alarm over security breaches through apps

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Cybersecurity firm, Kaspersky, has raised an alarm over security breaches, which emanated from apps downloads.

According to it, the target has primarily become mobile devices. Kaspersky noted that in 2019 the number of worldwide mobile phone users is expected to reach 4.68 billion of which 2.7 billion are smartphone users.

It noted that with smartphone users increasing, it makes users more vulnerable. Kaspersky said with several unsecured Wi-Fi connections, network spoofing, phishing attacks, ransomware, spyware and improper session handling – mobile devices make for the perfect easy target. In fact, according to Kaspersky mobile apps are often the cause of unintentional data leakage.

General Manager for Kaspersky in Africa, Riaan Badenhorst, said: “Apps pose a real problem for mobile users, who give them sweeping permissions, but don’t always check security. These are typically free apps found in official app stores that perform as advertised, but also send personal – and potentially corporate – data to a remote server, where it is mined by advertisers or even cybercriminals.

“Data leakage can also happen through hostile enterprise-signed mobile apps. Here, mobile malware uses distribution code native to popular mobile operating systems like iOS and Android to spread valuable data across corporate networks without raising red flags.”

In fact, according to recent reports, six Android apps that were downloaded 90 million times from the Google Play Store were found to have been loaded with the PreAMo malware, while another recent threat saw 50 malware-filled apps on the Google Play Store infect over 30 million Android devices. Surveillance malware was also loaded onto fake versions of Android apps such as Evernote, Google Play and Skype.

Kaspersky said considering that as of 2019, Android users were able to choose between 2.46 million apps, while Apple users have almost 1.96 million app options to select from, and that the average person has 60-90 apps installed on their phone, using around 30 of them each month and launching nine per day – it’s easy to see how viral apps take several social media channels by storm.

Enterprise Sales Manager at Kaspersky in Africa, Bethwel Opil, “In this age where users jump onto a bandwagon because it’s fun or trendy, the Fear of Missing Out (FOMO) can overshadow basic security habits – like being vigilant on granting app permissions.

In fact, accordingly to a previous Kaspersky study, the majority (63 per cent) of consumers do not read license agreements and 43 per cent just tick all privacy permissions when they are installing new apps on their phone. And this is exactly where the danger lies – as there is certainly ‘no harm’ in joining online challenges or installing new apps.”

However, it is dangerous when users just grant these apps limitless permissions into their contacts, photos, private messages, and more. “Doing so allows the app makers possible, and even legal, access to what should remain confidential data. When this sensitive data is hacked or misused, a viral app can turn a source into a loophole which hackers can exploit to spread malicious viruses or ransomware,” Badenhorst added.

Kaspersky advised that online users should be mindful and be more careful when it comes to the Internet and their app habits including: only download apps from trusted sources. Read the reviews and ratings of the apps as well; select apps you wish to install on your devices wisely; read the license agreement carefully; pay attention to the list of permissions your apps are requesting. Only give apps permissions they absolutely insist on, and forgo any programme that asks for more than necessary; avoid simply clicking “next” during an app installation; for an additional security layer, be sure to have a security solution installed on your device.

“While the app market shows no signs of slowing down, it is changing. Consumers download the apps they love on their devices which in turn gives them access to content that is relevant and useful. The future of apps will be in real-world attribution, influenced by local content and this type of tailored in-app experience will lead consumers to share their data more willing in a trusted, premium app environment in exchange for more personalised experiences. But until then, proceed with caution,” Opil said.

Source: https://guardian.ng/business-services/business/kaspersky-raises-alarm-over-security-breaches-through-apps/

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Security

Google publishes Android Q Security Release Notes

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The public release of Android Q is officially a “few weeks away,” and Google is gearing up for the launch. “Android version Q Security Release Notes” published today detail the vulnerabilities addressed by the upcoming version of the OS.

These “Security Release Notes” were published to the 2019 Android Security Bulletins list that’s usually updated on the first Monday of every month. Appearing as the very last entry, this document is formatted in a similar manner. An “Announcements” section states how:

  • The issues described in this document are addressed as part of Android Q. This information is provided for reference and transparency.
  • We would like to acknowledge and thank the security research community for their continued contributions towards securing the Android ecosystem.

A new security patch level of 2019-09-01 is mentioned even though Android Q Beta 6 devices today are still on August 2019. Google notes how “Android Q, as released on AOSP, has a default security patch level of 2019-09-01.”

Android Q, as released on AOSP, has a default security patch level of 2019-09-01. Android devices running Android Q and with a security patch level of 2019-09-01 or later address all issues contained in these security release notes.

However, the fact that Android Q is running the September security patch should not be surprising as Google has been targeting Q3 2019 since March for a public launch.

There are 2 vulnerabilities relating to the Android runtime, 24 as part of Framework, and 2 in Library. Media framework lists 68 and System 97. All entries are classified as “Moderate” severity.

Source: https://9to5google.com/2019/08/20/android-q-security-release-notes/

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Lightning-compatible YubiKey 5Ci could secure your iPhone logins

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iPhone owners with a mind toward security have a new option for protecting their online accounts. On Tuesday, security key manufacturer Yubico announced the $70 YubiKey 5Ci, which the company says is the world’s first Lightning port-compatible security key.

At launch, the 5Ci supports a variety of popular password managers, including 1Password, Dashlane, LastPass and Bitwarden. It’s also compatible with authentication services like Okta. In all those instances, you’ll be able to plug in the 5Ci into your iPhone, launch the security app of your choice and log in to an online account without ever entering a password. And if you happen to use Brave instead of Safari for web browsing, the 5Ci removes the need to first open a password manager first in the case of some online services.

The 5Ci also includes a USB-C port for when you need to log in through an Android device or computer. However, one limitation of the 5Ci is that it currently doesn’t work with the 2018 iPad Pro. We’ve reached out to Yubikey to find the exact reason for this limitation, but we suspect it has something to do with restrictions iOS 12 places on USB-C connectivity. That could change when iOS 13 comes out this fall. The Yubikey 5Ci also doesn’t work with any FIDO-compliant service or app out of the box. In a statement to The Verge, Yubico said third-party developers must add support for the 5Ci to their apps individually. A full list of compatible services is available on the company’s website.

If you’re not familiar with physical security keys, they’re currently one of the most effective ways to protect yourself against online hackers because they remove the need for passwords and one-time codes, both of which malicious individuals can easily intercept in the right circumstances. In 2018, Google said it was able to reduce successful phishing attacks on its 85,000 employees to zero thanks to a new policy of mandatory security keys.

However, at $70 the 5Ci is one of the more expensive security keys out on the market. If you’re looking for something more affordable, Yubico also offers the $45 YubiKey 5 NFC, which is similarly compatible with the iPhone. Another option is Google’s $50 Titan security key, which has the advantage of also working through Bluetooth. And while a security key will help keep you as safe as possible, most people need to start with a simple password manager, as reused passwords are the single largest culprit behind hacked accounts. Once you have a password manager, a security key like the YubiKey 5Ci is a good next step if you want to further secure your online accounts.

Source: https://www.engadget.com/2019/08/20/yubico-yubikey-5ci-iphone-lightning/

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