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“WEATHER STATION FOR SCHOOLS” PROJECT AIMS TO BUILD STUDENTS’ SKILLS IN COMPUTER NETWORKING AND DATABASES

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An Ambitious Project to Join Thousands of Schools in Africa in a Global Science Experiment to Build Students’ Skills in Computer Networking and Databases

1907-150423

 Oracle Academy (https://academy.oracle.com/oa-web-overview.html) and the Raspberry Pi Foundation (http://www.raspberrypi.org) today officially launched Oracle Raspberry Pi Weather Station for Schools (http://www.raspberrypi.org/education/weather-station), an ambitious project to join thousands of schools in Africa and around the world in a global science experiment. Participating schools will receive a Raspberry Pi hardware kit for students to build and operate their own weather station with the aim of gaining valuable skills spanning computing, meteorology and geography. Schools are encouraged to register their interest on Raspberry Pi’s website (https://www.raspberrypi.org/education/weather-station).

 

The first 1,000 kits have been funded by a grant from Oracle Giving (https://www.oracle.com/corporate/citizenship/corp-giving/index.html), which along with Oracle Academy, is part of Oracle’s philanthropic efforts, and will be provided to schools free of charge while supplies last. Half of the free kits have been set aside for Oracle Academy schools. In addition to building a weather station, the kits teach students to write application code that logs a range of weather data, including wind speed, direction, temperature, pressure, and humidity. Supplemental teaching materials for classroom use will be made available on the Oracle Academy website.

 

The Oracle Raspberry Pi Weather Station project is targeted at students aged 11-16 years old. Students will be asked to write applications to operate their weather station and record data in a cloud-hosted Oracle database, which they can then query through SQL elements developed in collaboration with Oracle Academy. They will also develop a website on Raspberry Pi to display local weather conditions that can be accessed by other participating schools. Additionally, students will be able to access a “Weather Station for Schools” microsite to blog about their experiences, interact with other participating schools around the globe, and receive online technical support.

 

Jane Richardson, Director, Oracle Academy EMEA, commented: “From application programming to database management, computer science skills can lead to rewarding and fulfilling careers. Our goal with the Oracle Raspberry Pi Weather Station project is not only to show students how computer science can help them measure, interrogate and understand the world better, but also to give them hands-on opportunities to develop these skills. We believe this is one of the best ways to inspire the next generation to take up the computer science roles that economies around the world need filled.”

 

Eben Upton, CEO, Raspberry Pi (Trading), stated: “This ambitious project adds another string to the Raspberry Pi bow, using the Raspberry Pi to introduce children to the art of data management and SQL. The kits themselves are really exciting, containing everything you would expect from a fully-functioning weather station. We’re confident that students will find the project a very engaging way of learning new and useful skills, and that they’ll have a lot of fun in the process.”

 

Colleen Cassity, Executive Director, Oracle Education Foundation, and Oracle Giving and Volunteers, commented: “It is exciting to support this global learning initiative that aims to generate awareness and interest in computer science and the natural world. The project will help to ensure that the next generation is well-prepared to lead and create value, not only in the digital economy, but also in the global community.”

 

Following the distribution of the 1,000 free weather station kits, they will be made available for schools to purchase at a later date.

 

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Oracle Corporation.

 

 

Contacts

Amanda Howett

Oracle

+44 75 188910

[email protected]

 

Oracle EMEA Press Office

CMG Team

+44 (0)844 875 1455

[email protected]

 

 

About Oracle Academy

 

Oracle Academy provides a complete portfolio of software, curriculum, hosted technology, faculty training, support, and certification resources to education institutions for teaching use.  Faculty can insert these resources into computer science and business programs, helping students gain industry-relevant skills and become college and career ready.  Oracle Academy supports more than 2.2 million students in 98 countries.  To learn more, visit http://oracle.com/academy.

 

 

About Oracle

Oracle engineers hardware and software to work together in the cloud and in your data center.  For more information about Oracle (NYSE:ORCL), visit oracle.com.

 

Trademark

Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

 

About the Raspberry Pi Foundation

The Raspberry Pi Foundation is a charity which was set up in 2009 to promote the study of computer science and related topics, especially at school level, and to put the fun back into learning computing. The charity makes the Raspberry Pi computer, which is used all over the world by teachers, learners and makers.

 

Press contact:

Liz Upton ([email protected])

 

Supporting Resources

 

SOURCE 

Oracle Corporation

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Nokia awarded contract to build 4G network on the moon

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Nokia has been awarded a contract to establish a 4G network on the moon. The contract is one of several that NASA is awarding to companies as it plans a return to the moon.

The $14.1 million contract was given to Nokia’s US subsidiary and is a small part of the $370 million total awarded to companies such as SpaceX. The cellular service will allow astronauts, rovers, lunar landers, and habitats to communicate with one another according to Jim Reuter, the Associate Administrator for NASA’s Space.

Nokia Logo

The 4G network that Nokia will build will be miles superior to the form of communication that was used during the early missions to the moon.

This is not Nokia’s first attempt to launch an LTE network on the moon. It planned to do so in 2018 in collaboration with PTScientists, a German space firm, and Vodafone UK to launch an LTE network at the site of the Apollo 17 landing but the plan never came to fruition.

Source: https://www.gizmochina.com/2020/10/18/nokia-awarded-contract-to-build-4g-network-on-the-moon/

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Stripe acquires Nigeria’s Paystack for $200M+ to expand into the African continent

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When Stripe  announced earlier this year that it had picked up another $600 million in funding, it said one big reason for the funding was to expand its API-based payments services into more geographies. Today the company is coming good on that plan in the form of some M&A.

Stripe is acquiring Paystack, a startup out of Lagos, Nigeria that, like Stripe, provides a quick way to integrate payments services into an online or offline transaction by way of an API. (We and others have referred to it in the past as “the Stripe of Africa.”)

Paystack  currently has around 60,000 customers, including small businesses, larger corporates, fintechs, educational institutions and online betting companies, and the plan will be for it to continue operating independently, the companies said.

Terms of the deal are not being disclosed, but sources close to it confirm that it’s over $200 million. That makes this the biggest startup acquisition to date to come out of Nigeria, as well as Stripe’s biggest acquisition to date anywhere. (Sendwave, acquired by WorldRemit in a $500 million deal in August, is based out of Kenya.)

It’s also a notable shift in Stripe’s strategy as it continues to mature: Typically, it has only acquired smaller companies to expand its technology stack, rather than its global footprint.

The deal underscores two interesting points about Stripe, now valued at $36 billion and regularly tipped as an IPO candidate. (Note: It has never commented on those plans up to now.) First is how it is doubling down on geographic expansion: Even before this news, it had added 17 countries to its platform in the last 18 months, along with progressive feature expansion. And second is how Stripe is putting a bet on the emerging markets of Africa specifically in the future of its own growth.

“There is enormous opportunity,” said Patrick Collison, Stripe’s co-founder and CEO, in an interview with TechCrunch. “In absolute numbers, Africa may be smaller right now than other regions, but online commerce will grow about 30% every year. And even with wider global declines, online shoppers are growing twice as fast. Stripe thinks on a longer time horizon than others because we are an infrastructure company. We are thinking of what the world will look like in 2040-2050.”

For Paystack, the deal will give the company a lot more fuel (that is, investment) to build out further in Nigeria and expand to other markets, CEO Shola Akinlade said in an interview.

“Paystack was not for sale when Stripe approached us,” said Akinlade, who co-founded the company with Ezra Olubi (who is the CTO). “For us, it’s about the mission. I’m driven by the mission to accelerate payments on the continent, and I am convinced that Stripe will help us get there faster. It is a very natural move.”

Paystack had been on Stripe’s radar for some time prior to acquiring it. Like its U.S. counterpart, the Nigerian startup went through Y Combinator — that was in 2016, and it was actually the first-ever startup out of Nigeria to get into the world-famous incubator. Then, in 2018, Stripe led an $8 million funding round for Paystack, with others participating, including Visa and Tencent. (And for the record, Akinlade said that Visa and Tencent had not approached it for acquisition. Both have been regular investors in startups on the continent.)

In the last several years, Stripe has made a number of investments into startups building technology or businesses in areas where Stripe has yet to move. This year, those investments have included backing an investment in universal checkout service Fast, and backing the Philippines-based payment platform PayMongo.

Collison said that while acquiring Paystack after investing in it was a big move for the company, people also shouldn’t read too much into it in terms of Stripe’s bigger acquisition policy.

“When we invest in startups we’re not trying to tie them up with complicated strategic investments,” Collison said. “We try to understand the broader ecosystem, and keep our eyes pointed outwards and see where we can help.”

That is to say, there are no plans to acquire other regional companies or other operations simply to expand Stripe’s footprint, with the interest in Paystack being about how well they’d built the company, not just where they are located.

“A lot of companies have been, let’s say, heavily influenced by Stripe,” Collison said, raising his eyebrows a little. “But with Paystack, clearly they’ve put a lot of original thinking into how to do things better. There are some details of Stripe that we consider mistakes, but we can see that Paystack ‘gets it,’ it’s clear from the site and from the product sensibilities, and that has nothing to do with them being in Africa or African.”

Stripe, with its business firmly in the world of digital transactions, already has a strong line in the detection and prevention of fraud and other financial crimes. It has developed an extensive platform of fraud protection tools, but even with that, incidents can slip through the cracks. Just last month, Stripe was ordered to pay $120,000 in a case in Massachusetts after failing to protect users in a $15 million cryptocurrency scam.

Now, bringing on a business from Nigeria could give the company a different kind of risk exposure. Nigeria is the biggest economy in Africa, but it is also one of the more corrupt on the continent, according to research from Transparency International.

And related to that, it also has a very contentious approach to law and order. Nigeria has been embroiled in protests in the last week with demonstrators calling for the disbanding of the country’s Special Anti-Robbery Squad, after multiple accusations of brutality, including extrajudicial killings, extortion and torture. In fact, Stripe and Paystack postponed the original announcement in part because of the current situation in the country.

But while those troubles continue to be worked through (and hopefully eventually resolved, by way of government reform in response to demonstrators’ demands), Paystack’s acquisition is a notable foil to those themes. It points to how talented people in the region are identifying problems in the market and building technology to help fix them, as a way of improving how people can transact, and in turn, economic outcomes more generally.

The company got its start back when Akinlade, for fun (!) built a quick way of integrating a card transaction into a web page, and it was the simplicity of how it worked that spurred him and his co-founder to think of how to develop that into something others could use. That became the germination of the idea that eventually landed them at YC and in the scope of Stripe.

“We’re still very early in the Paystack payments ecosystem, which is super broken,” said Akinlade. The company today provides a payments API, and it makes revenue every time a transaction is made using it. He wouldn’t talk about what else is on Paystack’s radar, but when you consider Stripe’s own product trajectory as a template, there is a wide range of accounting, fraud, card, cash advance and other services to meet business needs that could be built around that to expand the business. “Most of what we will be building in Africa has not been built yet.”

Last month, at Disrupt, we interviewed another successful entrepreneur in the country, Tunde Kehinde, who wisely noted that more exits of promising startups — either by going public or getting acquired — will help lift up the whole ecosystem. In that regard, Stripe’s move is a vote of confidence not just for the potential of the region, but for those putting in the efforts to build tech and continue improving outcomes for everyone.

Source: https://techcrunch.com/2020/10/15/stripe-acquires-nigerias-paystack-for-200m-to-expand-into-the-african-continent/?tpcc=ECTW2020

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#EndSARS Twitter’s Jack Dorsey seeks support with Bitcoin

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Billionaire boss of the leading social media platform Twitter, and payments company Square, Jack Dorsey, has joined in support of the #EndSARS protest that has overtaken Nigeria.

A few hours ago, Dorsey took to his Twitter handle to solicit support for Nigerian protesters seeking an end to Police brutality and calling for reforms.

He tweeted, “Donate via Bitcoin to help #EndSARS,” while also retweeting a tweet from the Feminist Coalition informing people of the modes by which contributions can be made.

 

Twitter CEO has been a longstanding Bitcoin supporter. In the past, he has said Bitcoin is “probably the best” native currency of the internet due to it being “consensus-driven” and “built by everyone.”

Recall, some days ago, Square, Inc. (NYSE: SQ) led by Twitter’s Jack Dorsey on October 8th disclosed that it purchased, 4,709 bitcoins at an estimated worth of $50 million.
Square added it invested in cryptos because it saw it as a tool for economic enhancement via participation in the future of payment systems, which aligns with Square’s objectives.

Source: https://nairametrics.com/2020/10/14/breaking-endsars-twitters-jack-dorsey-seeks-support-with-bitcoin/

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