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What Google searches tell us about our coronavirus thoughts and fears

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Life during the coronavirus pandemic is full of questions.

And for many of those questions, people are turning to the internet and, by extension, to Google. Google is by far the world’s dominant search engine, fielding about 90 percent of the world’s online queries. So Google has more insight into our internet searches than any other company.

Fortunately for the data nerds among us, the company makes those search trends readily available with a website called Google Trends. This tool lets people compare how popular one search is over time or compared with another, offering insight into what people are curious about. That’s particularly helpful with the coronavirus, which has consistently dominated search queries in the past few months — even beyond more quotidian standbys like weather, music, and video.

We spoke with Simon Rogers, data editor at Google, who has been putting out a fascinating daily newsletter and coronavirus page from Google Trends data about different trending searches and what they might mean.

This interview has been edited for clarity and brevity.

Rani Molla

For those who aren’t familiar, can you explain what Google Trends is?

Simon Rogers

Google Trends is basically a public tool that anybody can use. It takes a sample of all search — there are billions of searches every day, so it couldn’t possibly measure every one — and basically all of those searches go through this process where we try and work out what they’re really about, which topics they’re about. And then what we do is try and make that data easier for people to access.

So around something like coronavirus, say, that’ll be where we would look at the top questions that somebody will be asking about the virus. Google Trends is, I would say, the world’s largest free-access, journalistic data set. And it’s ever-changing, and every day it gives you a sense of what people really care about.

Rani Molla

What advantage does Google Trends have over other datasets?

Simon Rogers

There’s ubiquity in search. It takes you beyond that echo chamber of social media. Because you’re not presenting yourself in a certain way, you’re being honest. You’re never as honest as you are with your search engine. You get a sense of what people genuinely care about and genuinely want to know — and not just how they’re presenting themselves to the rest of the world. And it’s immediate. As soon as something happens, it shows up in search.“You’re never as honest as you are with your search engine”

Rani Molla

I’ve been paying attention to Google Trends a lot more during coronavirus. That’s because, as we’re spending more time at home and computers mediate our lives with the outside world even more, it seems like we’re getting a better window into what people’s thoughts and questions and fears are during the pandemic. Do you think that’s the case?

Simon Rogers

I think partly it’s because suddenly you’ve got this giant shared experience, something we’re all going through, and it’s very easy in that environment to feel isolated. What’s happened to you isn’t happening to anybody else. But you can get a real sense of how that’s reflected in the way that we search. Looking at the searches, right now, I think they almost split into two different categories.

On one side, there are people searching for the big issues around the virus: “Is there a vaccine yet?” or “Why does one drug work?” or “What are the symptoms?” — those kinds of big questions. And then the other side is the fallout from the virus, which are searches around things like loneliness and big emotional issues. And then there are also things like: “How do I cut my own hair?” or “How do I bake bread?” or “How do I keep the kids entertained?” — things we’re all going through.

Rani Molla

Those latter trends have been some of the most interesting to me. I saw the bread, obviously, banana bread — I figure people are just buying way too many bananas and have to figure out how to deal with it — how to cut your own hair. One of the things that really blew me away was that all of a sudden everyone and their mother was Googling “how to make coffee” and must have never had to figure that out before. What do you make of that?

Simon Rogers

It’s funny, isn’t it? It’s all those things that we do during the day, not at home often. I think it’s partly because people want to expand their knowledge of something. So probably people know how to make instant coffee by now, right? But people will search for how to make Dalgona coffee, which is this kind of whipped thing with sugar in it that my daughter’s been doing tons of in the last five weeks. It’s things like that which are out of the ordinary, so they’re not necessarily things you would do if you didn’t have time at home and you weren’t thinking of how to just change things up a little bit.

Rani Molla

What are some of the more surprising searches you’ve seen trending?

Simon Rogers

The fact that there were things I’ve been thinking of personally — to see them show up in search is always interesting. Like we have a 3D printer, and I was thinking, I wonder if other people search for how to 3D print face masks to donate to hospitals, which is a very specific thing. Searches for 3D printing are higher than ever before in history. And there’s some things which are kind of reassuring, like searches for how to help, food donation, helping the community, how to volunteer — all of those things are higher than ever before.

It’s good to think that we’re thinking of others at this moment. But there’s big spikes in searches around very specific DIY that goes across both search data and YouTube data. And there’s a lot of big spikes in search for things that are homemade, weird stuff that I wouldn’t even think about, like homemade eyebrow wax, that makes sense but also scares me a little bit.

“There’s things that would have seemed weird like six weeks ago that don’t seem weird now”

Rani Molla

I could use some homemade eyebrow wax right about now.

Simon Rogers

Ha! Then, there’s more the how-to thing, like how to make a face mask at home or how to ripen avocados, how to divide fractions. We saw searches for “shredded” were spiking and we thought, “Oh, this is people talking about weightlifting or bodybuilding,” and actually it’s people searching for shredded chicken.

Rani Molla

What about the weirdest search?

Simon Rogers

There’s things that would have seemed weird like six weeks ago that don’t seem weird now. “Drive-by birthday party” spiked 5,000 percent, and that’s not something I or anybody had ever heard of before six weeks ago. And if you’d asked me this in March, I’d say well, this is a weird thing, but now it just feels normal.

Rani Molla

It’s the new normal. What about concerning Google searches? For example, this morning I saw that one of the highest-trending US coronavirus questions was, “Who created coronavirus?” which is this conspiracy theory that keeps popping up and has no basis in fact.

Simon Rogers

There are things that are concerning for society like the spike in searches for “loneliness,” people searching for “having trouble sleeping,” “depression.” All of those things are concerning to me, and I worry for people that don’t have people with them or are feeling it. Then the other misinformation thing is really interesting, because normally around any political thing, you always see spikes and searches where people are trying to find out if a misinfo story is true.

But now, I do get the sense that the highest spikes are things around searches for reliable information, like people searching for cdc.gov or wherever are really high at the moment. So I wonder whether that’s because we’re looking for things we know are true. Occasionally, misinfo things do show up. But if you have politicians saying, “Coronavirus was created somewhere,” then people are going to search for that. And that’s just a side effect of where we are right now. I think the fact that people are looking for it is actually a good thing because it means we want to know if it’s true or not. They’re not necessarily just going to accept it.“If you have politicians saying, ‘Coronavirus was created somewhere,’ then people are going to search for that”

Rani Molla

Is there any real-world stuff that you could do with Google Trends, especially as it relates to public health. Like, could you see where there are new coronavirus hot spots or something like that?

Simon Rogers

The country-level datasets, which we update every day, shows the top 100 places searching for coronavirus as well as the top related queries, which are what people type in when they search for the virus. Governments have noticed different stages for different things that are popping up in search and then change their official information to reflect that. I think we’re really at the beginning of how useful this is.

One of the things we’ve been thinking about are these kind of patterns of search around the virus. What you see is when people don’t really have many cases, lots of searches are very informational like, “What is coronavirus?” And then when cases start happening then there are things like, “What are the symptoms of coronavirus?” And then it gets to more sophisticated questions when you’re living in lockdown.

Like in New York, for instance, you’ll see questions around things like, “How long does coronavirus live on surfaces?” or “When’s the lockdown going to end?” or “How do I get my stimulus check?” So you can really see how things change over time. I think you could probably build a really interesting model around that. This is a real-time reaction to the situation around people.

Rani Molla

Are there any regional or country-specific differences in coronavirus that have stuck out to you?

Simon Rogers

There are some differences. For instance, in France right now they have these zones of infection, so people search for the “red zone,” and before that was people searching for a pass to leave Paris and things like that. You see these kinds of country differences, but really the way that the search evolves is common across countries.

So if you were to look at the searches in, say, Milan seven weeks ago, they are very similar to searches we’re seeing in New York now. It’s almost like the big questions are common across all of us. We’re all trying to find the same things. It comes out of the uncertainty of knowing there isn’t a cure, there isn’t a vaccine right now. That uncertainty leads to a lot of similar questions in different places.

Rani Molla

What don’t we see in Google Trends data?

Simon Rogers

We can’t tell demographics. I don’t know who somebody is. The data is anonymized so you don’t get individual data. So, I can’t tell you how different age groups search or anything like that. Also, unless you’re extrapolating something from the data, what you can tell is what people care about, but you can’t tell what their opinions are about it.

Rani Molla

What should people not be Googling?

Simon Rogers

I wouldn’t tell anybody not to Google anything, because that’s such a personal thing. I think people need to think about information with the same care they think about any aspect of their lives. If you’re consuming information, you want it to be reliable. Just thinking of information as this valuable resource that matters is really important.

I think I’d rather have people Googling everything, searching for everything, rather than accepting something without searching for it. I’d much rather you looked up stuff yourself than just believe things on face value, wherever they’re coming from.

Source: https://www.vox.com/platform/amp/recode/2020/5/5/21243854/google-trends-search-coronavirus-simon-rogers

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Apple’s Stunning MacBook Design Looks Like Microsoft’s Surface Book

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Its move from Intel-based processors to ARM-based processors is one that Apple has telegraphed officially since the announcement at WWDC 2020, with the first macOS on ARM machines for the public expected to be a MacBook and a MacBook Pro. The insides are changing, but what about the outside.

For now, your new Mac is going to look remarkably like your old Mac (possibly with slightly smaller bezels around a slightly larger screen). But Apple’s latest documents have confirmed that the company is working on a radical redesign of the laptop hinge.

Although it looks like Microsoft got there first with the Surface Book’s fulcrum hinge.

The details on the new hinge come from a recently published patent. Titled “Hinges For Electronic Devices And Accessory Devices”, it details a hinge that is made up from a mix of rolling elements with fixed elements between them. This allows for a hinge that looks remarkably close to the hinge on the aforementioned Surface Book. Jack Purcher reports for Patently Apple:

“The new hinge system is also shown in conjunction with a possible future MacBook-like portable device. Microsoft was first to move to a flexible hinge system for their Surface book and Apple’s next-gen flexible hinge presents a similar style of hinge though technically different using multi-roller and spacer elements.

“Apple’s possible next-gen iPad keyboard accessories are shown to include multiple sections and a new hinge system assembly that provides additional flexibility and range of motion of the section holding the iPad, thereby allowing a user to position the iPad at multiple different angles relative to the section carrying the input mechanism.”

As can be seen, the patent is not restricted to a traditional laptop-styled device. It also features in a concept image of a keyboard and stand for a tablet device, and a ‘reverse opening’ hinge to lift up a screen from a laptop chassis.

It’s also worth noting that, although the line drawings in the patent echo the Surface Book, the mechanisms inside will differed and of course any finalised form may take on other characteristics.

And as with every patent, the act of filing a patent and having it published does not mean that the design will reach any retail devices. To balance that out, Apple has already pushed the design mix of tablet accessories with the iPad Pro’s Magic Keyboard, so its makes sense that imultiple hinge technologies have been both tested and patented.

Once Apple has redefined what it means to be a MacBook on the inside, it certainly has the tools to do the same to the outside. First up though, it needs to successfully launch the ARM-based laptops by the end of 2020.

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/ewanspence/2020/09/26/apple-macbook-pro-ipad-pro-patent-fulcrum-hinge/#746bb7c016d6

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Apple iPhone 12 Pro Max’s AnTuTu result shows minor performance gains

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Even though Apple didn’t announce any new iPhones during its September event, the company detailed the heart of the future phones – the Apple A14 chipset. Based on Apple’s claims at the announcement we estimated it to have a 17% faster CPU and 8% better GPU than its predecessor and a newly surfaced benchmark shows these numbers are close enough.

An AnTuTu benchmark run on the iPhone 12 Pro Max, reveals 16% higher CPU score and 4% better GPU result. There’s however a more pronounced boost in memory speeds – 22%, but overall the performance gains are clearly minor.

iPhone 12 Pro Max surfaces on AnTuTu with Apple's A14 chip

The combined result of 572,333 points might seem low, considering the Snapdragon 865+ Android competition goes above the 600,000 mark, but cross-platform benchmark comparison isn’t really a level playing field because there are differences in how the tasks are executed.

iPhone 12 Pro Max surfaces on AnTuTu with Apple's A14 chip

However, the comparison to the A13 should be fully relevant and it shows that the world’s first 5nm chipset won’t bring the performance leap many were expecting of it. There are three explanations that come to mind.

For one Apple might have prioritized battery draw over outright performance making the A14 use less power, while achieving what is roughly the same performance. That’s most likely it since the A14 Bionic pioneer – the Apple iPad Air 4th generation – has the same battery life as its predecessor despite packing an 8% smaller cell.

Alternatively, the move to 5nm chipsets might not yield the gains that we all hoped. While the almost 30% smaller process should theoretically deliver great efficiency boost, it may take time until it’s fully utilized.

Finally, this could be an engineering sample and the performance of the final units can be far better. However with Apple itself claiming modest gains close to these results that seems like a very long shot.

Source: https://www.gsmarena.com/iphone_12_pro_max_surfaces_on_antutu_with_apples_a14_chip-news-45343.php

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HOW MICROSOFT BUILT ITS FOLDING ANDROID PHONE

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Microsoft is returning to making phones this week, as part of an ambitious project to usher in a new era of dual-screen and folding devices. The company has spent around six years developing Surface Duo, its Android-powered device that folds out to be a phone or a miniature tablet. It’s taken Microsoft years to get the hardware and software right, but the company firmly believes now is the ideal time for something new. When it goes on sale tomorrow, we’ll see if the company got it right.

This is the story of how Microsoft’s new folding Android phone came to be.

Microsoft’s Panos Panay with a Surface Duo.
 Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

POCKETABLE AND MINI SURFACES

Panos Panay, Microsoft’s chief product officer, is known for his onstage energy and for constantly feeling pumped, but when it came time to build his dream Moleskine-like device, he spent months walking around in secret with a peculiar piece of hardware in his pocket. “We literally had two pieces of metal and a hinge that we put together,” explains Panay in an interview with The Verge. “We had this piece of metal that I carried around in my pocket for months.”

It was the early and primitive form for what eventually became the Surface Duo, and Panay spent months analyzing things like “fidget factor” and measuring how often he opened and closed the device. “Does it fit in your pocket? Can you sit on it? How big would the screen have to be if it wasn’t a traditional slab you were holding every day?” were some of the many questions he and his team were looking to answer.

Panay has been thinking about a pocketable or a small Surface device for years, even describing the idea as his “baby” at one point, but it was a painful journey to get to the Surface Duo. Work began on the Duo just after Microsoft had canceled the Surface Mini, an eight-inch tablet running Windows. Microsoft had been planning to launch this smaller Surface, but it ultimately wasn’t the right time back in 2014.

“It was emotional to stop,” says Panay. “Products are a reflection of the people that make them, that’s how we talk as a team. These products become who you are at work, and we spend a lot of time at work.”

If there’s anything that Microsoft has learned from trying to harmonize Surface hardware and software, it’s that timing is everything. “One of things that we’ve really developed a strong muscle for is the ability to know timing for when a product is right,” explains Steven Bathiche, who oversees all hardware innovation for Microsoft devices like Surface, Xbox, and HoloLens. “Timing is a thing I’ve learned is the most important thing, it’s more important than the idea itself in fact. All the ingredients really have to be right. This is probably why in the past you haven’t seen some of these ideas really make it through.”

Microsoft’s Surface mini.
 Image: Windows Central

That’s why the Surface Mini never launched. “Mini just wasn’t right because it didn’t have the apps for the form factor,” explains Panay. “There were a lot of challenges for Mini. I still have my Mini, it’s running Windows RT, but it didn’t have everything it needed for that form.” Surface Mini would have run Windows, which meant apps would have needed to be updated for the form factor, and the size and OS choice meant you’d still have to carry around a mobile phone.

While the Surface Mini cancellation was painful, it was an important part of the history of the Surface Duo and influenced what hardware choices were made. Microsoft moved on to a device codenamed “Andromeda” before shifting to the Surface Duo. While the Surface team is reluctant to talk about Andromeda in detail, sources tell The Verge it was a similar dual-screen device that was thicker and bulkier than the Surface Duo. Microsoft had planned to run a custom variant of Windows on Andromeda, and the camera hardware was also different to what exists in the Duo.

“At that time, it was different hardware, it’s not the same hardware… it’s not even remotely close,” says Panay. The key principles of Surface Duo existed in Andromeda, though: two screens side by side, with a hinge that allowed the device to fold out into place. “We’re in so many generations later of development [with Surface Duo], we understand how thin it is, we understand reliability, we understand the robustness of the screens. It has been generationally made, it’s years in the making.”

Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

FOLDING HARDWARE

Surface Mini and Andromeda helped Microsoft experiment with the idea of a pocketable Surface device, and the learnings have helped. The idea of a foldable display, like what’s found on Samsung’s Galaxy Fold, was quickly discarded in favor of the reliability of two flat screens. “It wasn’t difficult for us to realize that taking a screen and folding it wasn’t the right option for this product,” explains Bathiche. “We wanted glass. We wanted glass that wouldn’t scratch because we also wanted to give you a pen. We also wanted a 360-degree hinge, and we wanted to be able to do that without compromising the thickness of the device.”

Microsoft decided early on that there wouldn’t be a cover display, meaning you have to make an intentional choice to unfold the Duo to see the displays and even notifications. These fundamental choices allowed Microsoft to focus on important hardware aspects like keeping the device thin, creating a reliable hinge, and the idea of bringing the dual-screen computing you’re used to on your Windows desktop PC into your pocket.

“One of the things that we learned on Surface Mini that was actually really valuable for us is when you’re designing these super thin structures you want to come up with a mechanical architecture,” says Pavan Davuluri, a distinguished Microsoft Surface engineer. “You’re coalescing and condensing a lot of the mechanical components — structural, thermal, and RF pieces — into a single internal frame.”

This internal frame has allowed Microsoft to spread the Surface Duo components across both sides, while keeping the device just 4.8mm thin. “Most phones are buckets essentially, it’s a bucket that you fill with parts and put glass on the backside,” explains Davuluri. “That’s not how Surface Duo was built. Duo was built with an internal frame that really is the development scheme for integrating all these dual-system components.”

Microsoft experimented with a few different internal architectures. One didn’t even have dual screens, and another was just a phone powering a second screen on the opposite side. “We had another variant where we were using wireless connectivity vs. wired,” says Davuluri, so the second display wasn’t physically connected.

Microsoft’s early Duo experiments.
 Microsoft
Microsoft

These prototypes would have meant the Duo would end up being thicker or one side would be heavier. “It was definitely easier to make one side thick and put everything on one side, and then make the other side super thin,” admits Bathiche. “We chose the hard way from an engineering standpoint, but we’re really proud of the result of the design… the device is symmetrical, which evokes its function as well.”

These hardware choices weren’t always easy, though. LCD displays would have made a lot of sense over OLED, but they would have added to the thickness of the device. There were intense debates inside Microsoft around the hardware that went into Surface Duo. “The whole LCD or OLED debate was a real one,” explains Bathiche. “I was really worried about it, because I knew some of the challenges we’d have to overcome that OLED didn’t really solve.”

Microsoft created a prototype Surface Duo with OLED displays, and the first hardware sample shocked Surface engineers. “When we got our first prototypes back… we opened it up and looked at it for the first time and realized ‘Holy cow, there’s a color shift that we didn’t essentially account for that happens when you look at OLED offscreen,’” recounts Bathiche. “Displays are like snowflakes, there’s no two alike.”

OLED color shifts aren’t easily noticeable on a single display, but when you put them side by side, it’s a different story. Microsoft had to work with display manufactures to widen the color viewing angles, and configure them to have the same contrast, color uniformity, and timing.

There were also intense debates over the thinness of the Surface Duo. “People wanted to violate thinness every which way, across the board you can pick any of the tech that went into it,” explains Pete Kyriacou, a senior director of Microsoft’s Surface team. These debates and internal tension ultimately led to Microsoft creating an incredibly thin device.

“This is the most emotional product we’ve ever created,” says Panay. “A lot of that comes from tension. To get that diamond out, there had to be a lot of it. Microns mattered, not millimeters, microns. I remember being in meetings and being like ‘Come on, Pete, we’re talking less than a millimeter tradeoff that’s all we need to solve this product.” Kyriacou didn’t move on the thin focus, and the team had to find other ways to solve problems. “Maybe that’s why it took years to get to this product,” admits Panay. “There were moments like those because we pushed so many boundaries.”

The original Surface Duo prototype that Panay carried around.
 Microsoft

Some of these hardware choices for dual screens and the device thinness have also led to the Duo missing things like 5G connectivity or NFC support. The camera isn’t what you’d expect to find on a flagship Android device in 2020, largely because of how thin the Surface Duo is. “We had to stay maniacally focused on the weight, the symmetry, and the battery life of the system,” reveals Davuluri. “That, in turn, drove the choice of what kind of sensor we picked, and what kind of optics system had to live in that footprint, and how we had to optimize the camera software experience.”

The camera module inside the Surface Duo is one of the smallest on the market to make sure it fits inside the 4.8mm thickness. Microsoft has optimized for both front and rear photography, but it’s obvious the camera will have some serious limitations.

Microsoft also experimented with other enclosure materials during its early Surface Duo mockup phase. Some prototypes included fabric or metal, similar to what we’ve seen on Surface keyboards. “We liked that fabric enclosure material because it gave us some properties in Surface Mini like our speakers were built out of fabric on that product at the time,” says Davuluri. “There were things we really liked about fabric… but it didn’t meet all of our requirements for our current generation and future generation products.”

Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

GOOGLE SOFTWARE

Beyond the hardware experimentation, the software and OS powering the Surface Duo were also incredibly important. Microsoft had been experimenting with a custom variant of Windows for its Andromeda device, but the company switched directions and moved to Android. It wasn’t an easy decision to make.

“Bringing Android into the fold, that wasn’t the most simple of conversations all of the time,” admits Panay. “You have to explain that and you want your team on board and people believing it.” Apps were a limiting factor for a Windows- or Windows Phone-powered device, and Panay has previously admitted it’s the key reason the Surface Duo runs Android. Apps and even the Android software running on Surface Duo won’t be perfect just yet, as Google hasn’t fully optimized the OS for this type of hardware, but Microsoft is working with Google to improve Android.

“As we got into working with Android, it wasn’t about just doing things specifically for Duo,” explains Kyriacou. Microsoft has created a dual-screen architecture, drag-and-drop APIs, screen-aware APIs, and even hinge APIs that all make apps light up across both screens. “We wanted to make sure we were working with Google to get that back into the ecosystem, so it’s not a forked version of Android. This is about working with them to make sure this all accrues to app developers and Android.”

Microsoft hasn’t heavily modified or skinned Android with the Surface Duo, either. “Our goal from the beginning was to stay as true to Android as possible,” says Kyriacou. “Mainly for familiarity, but also to make sure the changes we would make for windowing or hinge angle / postures would be part of the Android operating system going forward.”

Software updates and OS tweaks are a lot easier to roll out than hardware changes, so expect to see the Duo improve regularly, especially when Android 11 arrives. Microsoft is also promising three years of Android updates for the Surface Duo, so it will benefit from any work Microsoft and Google are doing to improve Android for years to come.

Microsoft has been working on improving gestures and the keyboard experience on Surface Duo in recent months, and more improvements are on the way. “In addition to our normal fixes, we’ll also be updating features that drive a great dual-screen experience,” adds Kyriacou. “We will be on future versions of Android when the time is right.”

THE FUTURE

Microsoft’s folding and dual-screen ambitions don’t end with just the Surface Duo. The company is still planning to launch a Surface Neo device, powered by Windows 10X. Microsoft unveiled the Surface Neo last year alongside the Duo, complete with two separate nine-inch displays that fold out into a full 13-inch workspace. It was supposed to launch later this year. “Neo is delayed,” says Panay. “I wanted the right time to bring that product with the right experience. We believe in that concept and form factor and size. It will be a beautiful complement to Duo with Windows and I’m excited about it. It’s a product that’s near and dear to my heart.”

Surface Duo and Neo won’t be the only dual-screen devices Microsoft is creating, either. “I believe that different sizes will happen, and I actually believe different companies will make different sizes too, and I think they should,” says Panay. “We want dual-screen architecture to be prevalent, we want every app to work on these screens, and we’re fundamentally committed to that. It includes a roadmap of multiple sizes.”

Surface Duo and Surface Neo.
 Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

How Microsoft balances the choice to run Windows or Android on different sizes will be interesting in the years ahead, especially as the company has been pushing Android closer to Windows with its Your Phone app. You can now run your phone’s Android apps beside Windows apps on a desktop PC, and it’s easy to imagine Microsoft may go further with this integration in the future.

“The next natural evolution is different [dual-screen] sizes,” says Panay. “Whether the larger moves into Windows where it’s appropriate to use the Windows codebase and software, and the smaller form factor uses Android, I think you can safely say that’s the right path with what we’re doing right now as a team.”

Panay believes Duo and dual-screen devices are here to stay, and the hardware will clearly evolve in the future. “Two screens matters. I believe when people start using it they’re going to adapt to these products, they’re going to fall in love with them.”

We might have to wait until foldable glass is a little more reliable before we see it on a Surface device, though. “I think it’s an exciting era of research, it’s one of the things we’re really on top of,” explains Bathiche. “We know all the physics problems that need to be addressed to deliver the experience that we really want to go after, but for us, not yet.”

Microsoft truly believes that the Surface Duo, and devices like it, will change the way people use mobile devices. That belief is rooted in the work the company has been doing in Windows for more than 30 years, allowing PC users to window apps, drag and drop content, and support multiple monitors to multitask.

Bringing that to mobile devices won’t be easy, and Microsoft is hoping the third time’s the charm after Windows Mobile and Windows Phone failed to make a dent in the mobile market. Just like Microsoft had to prove Surface tablets made sense in the first place, the company will once again have to demonstrate that there’s even a need for a device like the Surface Duo.

The future of mobile devices could go in a variety of different directions. Not everyone will have a need for a device like the Surface Duo immediately — or maybe ever. But then not everyone needed to check their email on the go or browse the mobile web when the first stylus-driven smartphones appeared. Microsoft is betting that behaviors will change, or as Panay puts it: “it’s a product that I believe is transformative for the future.”

Source: https://www.theverge.com/21426955/microsoft-surface-duo-folding-android-phone-history

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