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Welcome to the multi-stage life

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How long do you expect to live? If the question is a little candid, it is also absolutely germane. And that is because we humans are living longer than at any other point in our history. 

Since the 1850s there has been a steady shift in global demography and longevity. With the introduction of public health systems, people in many countries began to have a better chance of living beyond the age of 40. Over time countries became more differentiated in terms of how life expectancy, as well as the number of children being born to families. 

A century later, in the 1950s, advances in cardiology meant that a heart attack, long the scourge of middle age, did not automatically mean a death sentence. 

Today, medicine is tackling the diseases of old age. The pharmaceutical industry is making significant investments in prolonging lives, driving a demographic transition across the globe. In Japan for example, this demographic transition means that the average citizen age is now 46. In tandem, the country has become a beacon for the rest of the world, investing heavily in AI and robotics to help people remain productive for longer. 

“China will age faster than Japan as longevity increases and family size diminishes”

But if Japan has the oldest population on the planet, the rest of the world is following closely behind. Indeed, China will age faster than Japan as longevity increases and family size diminishes. And populations in the west are expected to follow suit. 

As people age, what does it mean for countries, societies, businesses and individuals? What will happen when everyone lives to 100?

The end of the three-stage life?

Typically, we think about the path of our life in three stages. We start in full-time education, progress to full-time work and finally move into full-time retirement. These three stages also bind us to age cohorts: if you’re in your teens you’re part of the college cohort; 20s to 65 you’re a worker; and those of us 65 or older are all bus-pass holders.

Packaging life up neatly into three stages is good news for governments,  it makes policy-making straightforward as age equals stage. But as the global population gets older, it is unlikely that this simple framework can survive. Pension policies that worked with older generations (because people died younger) cannot indefinitely remain financially viable. And in a 100 year life, retirement at 65 will mean more than 35 years on the golf course. And that’s economically unsustainable by any measure.

Meanwhile, research suggests that retirement might actually be bad for our health. While rewarding work brings social capital, drives connectivity and keeps us moving, almost the opposite can be said for protracted periods of retirement – especially if economic options are restricted.

So, what’s the answer?

Should we save more of our salary? Should we retire on less than 50% of our working income? Or, as Andrew Scott and I believe, will we need to continue to work into our mid-70s?

Is 80 the new old?

Working until the age of 75 has little appeal if we continue to think about life in terms of the three-stage rubric of education, career and retirement. But longer life gives us an opportunity to re-think this paradigm and look for alternative ways to imagine age.

This will come with challenges. Getting a job in any country when you are over the age of 55 is hard – ageism is as widespread as it is embedded. In most countries set views about age are part of the fabric of the culture – as insidious as they are deleterious to individual choices. Tackling age discrimination will be crucial in avoiding fiscal catastrophe and supporting a countries’ healthcare system. As populations age, the onus will be on governments to rethink policy and regulation.

But it’s not just about government action- across our communities we need to shift how we think about age. Typically age is viewed chronological – the number of candles on your birthday cake. But how you age is not simply determined by your DNA, which accounts for less than 25% of the ageing process. The good news is that lifestyle really  matters – how we exercise, what we eat and the way we live. We have the chance to live healthily into our eighties, nineties and possibly one-hundreds.

And if 80 is the new ‘old’ – then working into our seventies make sense. But what does that that say about the three-stage life? What changes do we need to make as employers or employees to better utilise talent and resources across this long life? And what do we need to do to sustain ourselves and preserve a good quality (longer) life?

Transitioning to the multi-stage life

One answer is to shift to a new paradigm. A more flexible life structure that gives us the option of reorganising our time so that assigning activities (leisure, work, learning, sabbaticals, caring) takes place across our whole life – in other words a multi-stage life.

Making this transition means fundamentally considering and redistributing time as a resource. And that bring challenges. Take for example taking time out for learning or caring. In most cultures and organisations, employees are penalised for taking time off work. Indeed parental leave often carries sanctions that inevitably impact salary or professional advancement, so much so that most men in the west refuse to take it. The results are often negative, creating a rigidity that pushes employees down narrow career channels, creating well-being issues and causing stress. 

“There’s a very real need for employers and employees to urgently discover new ways of distributing time”

If we are going to work until later in our lives, there’s a very real need for employers and employees to urgently discover new ways of distributing time that breaks away from the linear. What’s to stop us from dipping into retirement time earlier and repurpose that time for, say, education and training? Because living to 100 and working to 75 in the era of digital disruption and technological innovation, will mean prioritising learning. There is no doubt that as the impact of machines on work gathers pace, there will be a constant need to reskill, upskill and acquire new knowledge.

Automation, AI and robotics raise deeper questions about what it means to be human at a time of longevity. As routine tasks are increasingly performed by machines, so the more cognitive or empathic skills become the purview of humans. Ensuring that employees can stay creative and productive longer into their working lives means that as well as making time for training, organisations will need to prioritise their creativity and well-being too.

Wellbeing hinges on good health. Living longer and staying fit and healthy means investing significant amounts of time in activities like sport and exercise. But health is only part of our well-being. Friendships and relationships have an enormous role to play in our long-term happiness. As family structures change and ever more women have careers, traditional family roles are evolving and being replaced by more ‘negotiated’ and time intensive relationships. 

welcome-to-the-multi-stage-life-book

Today’s work structures were designed for a specific type of family, of technology, of life expectancy that is now changing – and changing fast. The challenge for organisations is to become more flexible and adaptive. The challenge for each one of us is to think deeply about how we distribute our time, how we learn and explore, and how we remain healthy and happy in our lives. The good news is that that we’re going to have plenty of time on our hands to ponder these things.

Source: https://www.london.edu/think/welcome-to-the-multi-stage-life

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iPhone 11 Pro Max vs. Galaxy S20 Ultra speed test results are shocking

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  • Samsung’s top of the line Galaxy S20 Ultra packs 16GB of RAM and goes head to head with Apple’s flagship iPhone 11 Pro Max in an old-fashioned speed test.
  • Apple’s top of the line iPhone typically trounces Android competitors, but the S20 Ultra delivers performance that can actually stand up to Apple’s industry-leading A13 Bionic processor.
  • The Galaxy S20 Ultra just barely bests Apple’s iPhone 11 Pro Max, but the tides will undoubtedly shift once Apple releases the iPhone 12 later this year.

Given that the modern-day smartphone market is nearly 13 years old at this point, It’s a bit funny that we’re still conducting speed tests with the top smartphones on the market. After all, whether you’re a hardened Android user or partial to the iPhone, the reality is that any flagship you buy today offers up performance that was simply unheard of even a few years ago. Suffice it to say, it’s hard to imagine a scenario where someone plunks down money for a new iPhone or Android device and subsequently complains about sluggish performance.

Still, there can only be one king and, perhaps out of sheer curiosity alone, the public often demands to know which smartphone stands out above all the rest. In light of that, the PhoneBuff YouTube channel recently decided to pit an iPhone 11 Pro Max armed with Apple’s A13 Bionic against a Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra armed with a Snapdragon 865 from Qualcomm. It’s an old-fashioned speed test and we’re here to see which flagship takes the crown this year.

As a quick point of interest, before we get to the test itself, it’s worth noting that the iPhone 11 Pro Max has 4GB of RAM while the Galaxy S20 Ultra has a whopping 16GB of RAM. This, of course, shouldn’t come as much of a surprise given that Apple has always lagged behind in the RAM department.

With that said, it’s time to dive into the test itself. As evidenced by the video below, Samsung’s Galaxy S20 Ultra gets off to an impressive start and manages to accomplish an array of tasks a tad quicker than the iPhone 11 Pro Max. The iPhone 11 Pro Max, however, starts making a comeback and ultimately takes the lead once the task moves to opening up a 500-page document and conducting calculations in Microsoft Excel.

The iPhone 11 Pro Max, however, starts to lose ground once the task turns to photo editing in Snapseed. From task to task, the iPhone 11 Pro Max and Galaxy S20 Ultra are truly in a close back-and-forth battle. And while this may seem like par for the course, it’s worth noting that Apple’s flagship iPhone models routinely trounce all Android competitors. In short, the S20 Ultra really delivers in the performance department in a way that previous Samsung Galaxy flagships haven’t.

The iPhone ultimately wins the first lap but the S20 Ultra — bolstered by its 16GB of RAM — manages to open previously opened apps in their previous state slightly better than the iPhone. When the dust settled, Samsung’s S20 Ultra managed to eke out a small but yet significant victory over the iPhone 11 Pro Max by about 10 seconds.

Again, the victory here is somewhat symbolic given that Apple’s iPhone 12 will certainly crush the S20 Ultra when it comes to raw performance. Still, it’s a nice, if not somewhat rare, performance victory for Samsung.

Source: https://bgr.com/2020/03/17/xbox-series-x-price-1tb-expansion-card-ssd-tech-explained/

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Leak says iPhone 12 performance will crush every new Android phone

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  • The iPhone 12 is expected to feature a brand new Apple A14 processor that should be faster and more efficient than the A13 Bionic in the iPhone 11.
  • The A14 series will likely be manufactured by TSMC on a new 5nm process, a first for the industry.
  • A new leak says the A14 will be significantly faster than the A13, and therefore considerably faster than any of this year’s top Android devices.

For years, Apple has been at the forefront of chip innovation. The company’s A-series chips that power the iPhone and iPad always outperform same-year Android devices running the latest processors from Qualcomm, Samsung, and other chipmakers. Android has been trying to catch up with the iPhone ever since Apple introduced the first-ever 64-bit chip for mobile devices, and Android phones still are not able to top the iPhone’s impressive performance. The most recent A-series chip is the A13 Bionic processor that powers the iPhone 11 series, which is faster than anything available for Android devices. Benchmark tests showed that the Snapdragon 865 processor that powers the Galaxy S20 and other flagship 2020 Android handsets is no match for the A13. Real-life speed comparisons have proven the same thing when it comes to launching demanding apps or performing intensive tasks. The S20’s enormous amount of RAM does help Samsung compensate for the lack of raw power, but it’s still not enough. The A14 chips that will power Apple’s iPhone 12 phones will be even faster than the A13, delivering performance that’s not likely to be matched by any new Android device this year — and maybe even next year — according to a new leak.

Each new iPhone generation brings a brand new A-series chip that’s not just faster than its predecessor, but also more efficient. The A14 is already expected to be a 5nm processor, and it’ll likely be the first such chip to hit the market this year. TSMC, which manufactured most of the previous iPhone and iPad processors, is expected to mass-produce the 5nm CPU for the iPhone 12.

A first A14 benchmark just found its way online, Research Snipers reports, revealing the Geekbench 5 scores for the new chip.

The A14 seemingly scored 1658 and 4612 points in single- and multi-core scores, respectively, which are both significant increases over the A13, which gets 1329 and 3468 ratings in the same tests. We’re looking at speed increases of between 25% and 33% over last year’s model, which already outscores the Snapdragon 865 (Qualcomm), Exynos 990 (Samsung), and Kirin 990 (Huawei).

This new report also notes that the A14 chip will apparently be clocked at 3.1GHz, which is 400MHz higher than the A13’s 2.7GHz speed. Apple never makes a big deal of such details when talking about its ARM processors that power the iPhone and iPad. But if this leak is accurate, the A14 will be the first ARM processor to pass 3GHz. That’s an important milestone for mobile chips, especially considering all the chatter that says Apple is working on its first ARM-powered MacBook. The most recent A-series chip generations have scored better in benchmarks than the Intel chips that power the MacBook Pro, prompting speculation that an ARM MacBook is imminent.

Even if this new leak isn’t accurate, the A14 is still expected to significantly outperform its predecessor thanks to the jump to the new 5nm process. The report doesn’t say how efficient the A14 chip will be compared with the A13, but that’s probably the kind of information only Apple has access to.

A variation of the A14 is likely to power future iPad Pros, but that’s just speculation at this point. Apple is expected to unveil an iPad Pro refresh this spring, with the A13X being the likely CPU candidate for the new tablets. Meanwhile, the iPhone 12 should be unveiled this fall, probably in mid-September like previous models, but the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic may impact the launch event and the actual release date of the upcoming new iPhone 12 handsets.

Source: https://bgr.com/2020/03/16/this-new-iphone-12-concept-is-the-most-stunning-phone-ive-ever-seen/

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Flutter vs Native vs React-Native: Examining performance

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Today some of the most popular solutions to build mobile apps are native or cross-platform approaches using React Native or Flutter. While native development is positioned as AAA technical solution, it has some disadvantages that create market space for cross-platform apps to come in. In general, native development requires more effort from the development team to accomplish the project but it gives full control over tricky technical stuff under the hood. On the other hand, if you choose cross-platform, it can significantly speed up the development process due to a common code base, make project support easier and reduce expenses for development.

One more advantage of native over cross-platform development is performance. In the technical world, you can encounter “cross-platform apps are slow” stereotypes. We decided to test if it’s true and to what extend cross-platform apps are slower than native.


There are different types of performance, some of them are:

  1. Interacting with phone API (accessing photos, file system, getting GPS location and so on).
  2. Rendering speed (animation smoothness, frames per second while UI is changed or some UI effects that take place in time).
  3. Business logic (the speed of mathematical calculations and memory manipulations. This type of performance is most important for the apps with complex business logic).

In this article, we share the results of performance tests showing mathematical calculations of number Pi implemented in native and cross-platform approaches.


Memory-intensive test (Gauss–Legendre algorithm) for iOS

Memory-intensive test (Gauss–Legendre algorithm) for iOS

iOS

  • Objective-C is the best programming language for iOS development. Swift is 1.7 times slower compared to Objective C.
  • Surprise: Flutter is a bit faster than Swift (on 15%).
  • React Native is 20 times slower than Objective C.

CPU-intensive test (Borwein algorithm) for iOS

Image result for Flutter vs Native vs React-Native: Examining performance

iOS

  • Objective C is the best option for iOS app development. Swift is 1.9 times slower compared to Objective-C.
  • Flutter is 5 times slower than Swift.
  • React Native version is more than 15 times slower than the Swift version.

Memory-intensive test (Gauss–Legendre algorithm) for Android

Memory-intensive test (Gauss–Legendre algorithm) for Android

Android

  • Java and Kotlin have similar performance indications and are the best options for Android development.
  • Flutter is approximately 20% slower than native.
  • React Native is around 15 times slower than native.

CPU-intensive test (Borwein algorithm) for Android

CPU-intensive test (Borwein algorithm) for Android

Android

  • Java and Kotlin have similar performance indications and are the best options for Android development.
  • Native is 2 times faster then Flutter.
  • React native is around 6 times slower than native.

Technical details:

  1. All tests have been done on real physical devices (iPhone 6s IOS 13.2.3 and Xiaomi Redmi Note 5 running under Android 9.0);
  2. We measured performance on release builds. In some cases, debug builds can be significantly slower than the release builds.
  3. All tests were run several times and the average result was calculated.
  4. Gauss–Legendre & Borwein algorithms of calculating Pi numbers were used. The Pi number has been calculated 100 times with 10 million digits precision.
  5. Gauss–Legendre is a more memory-intensive algorithm in comparison with Borwein, but Borwein is more CPU-intensive.
  6. Source code

Key takeaways

  1. In summary, not all cross-platform apps are slow. What’s more than that, Flutter apps have higher performance than Swift apps.
  2. Objective C and Flutter will be a wise choice if you want to develop a super-fast iOS app.
  3. For the apps with high load calculations Flutter is a good option for both, Android and iOS app development.

Please let inVerita know if you struggle with picking a mobile tool for development, always happy to help.

Source: https://medium.com/swlh/flutter-vs-native-vs-react-native-examining-performance-31338f081980

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